February 8, 2021 | |Post a Comment

first_imgSUN PRAIRIE, Wis. (AP) — Administrators at a Wisconsin middle school say they have suspended teachers who were involved in an activity for sixth graders that included a question about how the students would punish slaves. An email sent Monday to parents at Patrick Marsh Middle School in Sun Prairie apologized for a “grave error in judgment” during the social studies class. The letter said an unnamed number of teachers have been placed on administrative leave. The activity gave the students a scenario that stated, ”A slave stands before you. This slave has disrespected his master by telling him ‘You are not my master’ How will you punish this slave?” It further explained that under Hammurabi’s Code the slave would be put to death.last_img read more

February 8, 2021 | |Post a Comment

first_imgDETROIT (AP) — The Donors of Color, a philanthropic group dedicated to pushing for racial equity in funding environmental projects nationwide, has launched a pledge drive challenging the nation’s top climate funders to shift 30% of their donations toward environmental efforts led by Black, Indigenous, Hispanic and other people of color. While the fight against climate change and for environmental justice has benefited in recent years from a growing push by politicians and activists, research shows funding isn’t spread equitably to communities of color, which are often hit hardest. The pledge drive, announced Thursday, aims to direct funding to groups whose boards and senior staff are at least half people of color, and whose work is focused on the most environmentally impacted communities.last_img read more

February 8, 2021 | |Post a Comment

first_imgMADISON, Wis. (AP) — Wisconsin Gov. Tony Evers has issued a new statewide mask order an hour after the Republican-controlled Legislature voted to repeal his previous mandate. The Democrat Evers said in a video message Thursday that his priority is keeping people safe and that wearing a mask is the most basic way to do that. Republicans who voted to repeal the order say Evers has exceeded his authority by issuing new public health emergencies rather than having the Legislature approve extensions. The repeal hadn’t even taken effect before Evers issued a new one. The Wisconsin Supreme Court is weighing a case that could settle the issue.last_img read more

January 26, 2021 | |Post a Comment

first_img “It really seems like people had fun,” she said. “All the players who were expected to come made it.” Junior Andrew Alea, president of The Shirt Committee, said by 3:30 p.m., people were already lined up to get their shirt. Former wide receiver Golden Tate’s image is on the front of the shirt along with the words, “Shake down the thunder.” The images for this year were chosen to help represent the past, present and future of Notre Dame football, Alea said. “The front is kind of cool, because [Tate] was No. 23, and this is the 23rd year for The Shirt,” Couey said. “By the time The Shirt was unveiled, there was a line of about 150 to 200 people waiting to get theirs,” he said. “The original image [of Hughes] is of him leading the team out of the tunnel,” Alea said. “His look, his pose is exactly what we are looking for in terms of a fierce Notre Dame player.” Despite rainy weather and cold temperatures Friday afternoon, students and fans still showed up en masse in front of the Hammes Notre Dame Bookstore to see this year’s design unveiled. “[The Shirt committee] wanted to make a shirt that is intense,” he said. “We wanted an ‘in your face’ shirt, we wanted to make [the design] pop.” Alea said the committee chose navy blue as their color to complement the powerful imagery they chose for the design. Alea said there is no pattern to choosing the color for The Shirt each year – rather, each committee chooses a color to best match their theme. Junior Lauren Couey, The Shirt’s unveiling coordinator, said considering the poor weather conditions, the turnout was “awesome.” Alea said “Shake down the thunder” was chosen as the text for the front because it is an iconic Notre Dame phrase, conveying the powerful sense of tradition The Shirt Committee strove for. “It represents the traditions …  We’re been fierce and always will be fierce,” he said. “We wanted to modernize the design of The Shirt and make it in-your-face, and I think we did a really great job of doing that.”,This year, the unveiling of The Shirt “shook down the thunder.” Despite rainy weather and cold temperatures Friday afternoon, students and fans still showed up en masse in front of the Hammes Notre Dame Bookstore to see this year’s design unveiled. Junior Lauren Couey, The Shirt’s unveiling coordinator, said considering the poor weather conditions, the turnout was “awesome.” “It really seems like people had fun,” she said. “All the players who were expected to come made it.” Junior Andrew Alea, president of The Shirt Committee, said by 3:30 p.m., people were already lined up to get their shirt. “By the time The Shirt was unveiled, there was a line of about 150 to 200 people waiting to get theirs,” he said. This year’s design is much different than those of previous years, Alea said. “[The Shirt committee] wanted to make a shirt that is intense,” he said. “We wanted an ‘in your face’ shirt, we wanted to make [the design] pop.” Alea said the committee chose navy blue as their color to complement the powerful imagery they chose for the design. “We wanted navy blue, because it’s a Notre Dame color, and especially with the powerful imagery, we thought the navy blue would help the white text pop better,” he said. Alea said there is no pattern to choosing the color for The Shirt each year – rather, each committee chooses a color to best match their theme. The images for this year were chosen to help represent the past, present and future of Notre Dame football, Alea said. “The players on The Shirt each represent something,” he said. “We chose [former running back] Alan Pinkett and [former wide receiver] Tim Brown [for] the back, because they are celebrating the past of Notre Dame football.” Pinkett and Brown’s pictures are shown in black and white to reflect their influence on the football program’s past. Former tailback Robert Hughes is also on the back of the shirt, but in color. “The original image [of Hughes] is of him leading the team out of the tunnel,” Alea said. “His look, his pose is exactly what we are looking for in terms of a fierce Notre Dame player.” The back of the shirt also features both the official 125th anniversary-year logo of the football program, and text about pride and tradition of the team. “We liked the look of a player running out of The Shirt, but moreover, we liked the look of a player running out of the traditions behind The Shirt and the football program,” Alea said. Former wide receiver Golden Tate’s image is on the front of the shirt along with the words, “Shake down the thunder.” “The front is kind of cool, because [Tate] was No. 23, and this is the 23rd year for The Shirt,” Couey said. Alea said “Shake down the thunder” was chosen as the text for the front because it is an iconic Notre Dame phrase, conveying the powerful sense of tradition The Shirt Committee strove for. “It represents the traditions …  We’re been fierce and always will be fierce,” he said. “We wanted to modernize the design of The Shirt and make it in-your-face, and I think we did a really great job of doing that.” “We wanted navy blue, because it’s a Notre Dame color, and especially with the powerful imagery, we thought the navy blue would help the white text pop better,” he said. This year’s design is much different than those of previous years, Alea said. The back of the shirt also features both the official 125th anniversary-year logo of the football program, and text about pride and tradition of the team. “We liked the look of a player running out of The Shirt, but moreover, we liked the look of a player running out of the traditions behind The Shirt and the football program,” Alea said. This year, the unveiling of The Shirt “shook down the thunder.” Former tailback Robert Hughes is also on the back of the shirt, but in color. “The players on The Shirt each represent something,” he said. “We chose [former running back] Alan Pinkett and [former wide receiver] Tim Brown [for] the back, because they are celebrating the past of Notre Dame football.” Pinkett and Brown’s pictures are shown in black and white to reflect their influence on the football program’s past.last_img read more

January 26, 2021 | |Post a Comment

first_imgMembers of the Saint Mary’s community heard author James Carroll speak at the 2012 Christian Culture Lecture on Tuesday night. The Christian Culture Lecture series, held in conjunction with the Department of Humanistic Studies, presents a preeminent figure in the humanities. The speaker explores an aspect of the Christian dimension of Western culture. Carroll, an award winning nonfiction and fiction writer, gave a lecture titled “The Reforming Dimension of Christianity in Western Culture and Beyond.” Carroll has written many notable books; among them are his memoir, “An American Requiem” and his novels, “The City Below” and “Secret Father,” both of which were named Notable Books of the Year by The New York Times. In the most current version of “Vatican II: The Essential Texts,” published earlier this month, Carroll and Pope Benedict XVI wrote introductions to the text. In the lecture, Carroll addresses the need for reform that the Second Vatican Council addressed, as well as the role of Vatican II 50 years later.   “We must reconcile the challenge of bringing one’s traditional faith with all its treasures into the age of reason,” Carroll said. Carroll explored the reformations brought out of Vatican II and the place the council holds in today’s world, not only for Christians but for all people. “Believers of all stripes have a moral obligation to examine that ways that religion abets violence and to change these ways,” Carroll said. “The obligation to do this is universal.” Carroll explored the way secular culture can trivialize belief. He said the reforms in Vatican II were needed “to the core of the Church.” Carroll said Vatican II represented a landmark shift in the Church’s attitudes. “The Church’s worldview changed and static scholasticism developed into active participation and exploration of faith,” Carroll said. “The doctrine was extensively developed and the Church’s perspective of truth changed.” The 50th anniversary of Vatican II, Carroll said, still marks a beginning and not an end. “The changes Vatican II brought to our Church go deep into the Christian imagination. When there is resistance to Vatican II, this is good news because people understand how deep the changes to our faith go,” he said. Carroll closed with a call for Christians to follow the authentic and loving Jesus. “The first followers of Jesus did not follow doctrine, but discipleship. [The disciples] imitated Jesus more than worshipped him,” he said. “The key to the true meaning of Christianity and the reform of Christianity is through the imitation of Jesus. The capacity for transcendence lies in every human person.”last_img read more

January 26, 2021 | |Post a Comment

first_imgThe women of Shades of Ebony are preparing to celebrate coeducation at Notre Dame with their event ’40 Years and Counting,’ which will take place Monday through Wednesday celebrating the contributions of women on campus. Senior Ally Jeter, outgoing vice president of Shades of Ebony, said the group was already planning a celebration of women on campus when they learned this year is the University’s 40th anniversary of coeducation.   “It originally started out as a program we were in called ‘High Heels, Higher Standards,’” Jeter said. “We just wanted it to be a celebration of women and all that we do here on campus and then we realized that it was 40 years of women specifically this year, so we wanted to incorporate that and capitalize on that and make it even grander. It’s … a celebration of women in the past, here in the present and also women in the future at Notre Dame, and all of our accomplishments  and  what we’ve contributed to the University.”  Freshman Chizo Ekechukwu, historian and Diversity Council representative for Shades of Ebony, said the group’s events will begin Monday afternoon with a service event. “We have ‘Women’s Week’ next week,” Ekechukwu said. “We have our service event on Monday at Saint Margaret’s House for us to give back to the community [and] we have an ice cream social with them.”  Ekechukwu said there will be an opportunity for group members and faculty from various departments to gather for dinner and engage in discussion at the Joyce Center’s Club Naimoli on Tuesday night. She said they will discuss important topics for women in American society during the dinner. “The dinner is with 75 women,” Ekechukwu said. “We have nine different tables and nine different topics and we’ll talk about different issues, from the representation of women to women in sports and things like that.”  On Wednesday, a prayer service in Ryan Hall and a ‘Girls’ Night In’ in the Coleman-Morse Center lounge will close out the ’40 Years and Counting’ celebration, Jeter said. Jeter said the prayer service is open to anyone, but the ‘Girl’s Night In’ is restricted to women. “[The prayer service] is open to everyone on campus. It will just be reflecting on the role of spirituality and being a woman here on campus,” Jeter said. “‘Girls’ Night In’ is specifically for women, just to have a place to go in fellowship after the prayer service.”  According to the group’s website, Shades of Ebony was officially recognized by the University in 2002 as a group for African American women on campus to discuss their experiences, foster sisterhood and perform service.  Freshman Ray’Von Jones, Shades of Ebony president-elect for the 2013-14 academic year, said the group’s goal is to help women on campus develop a positive self-image. “We’re basically trying to help promote positive self-image between African American and other women on campus,” said Jones. Jeter said the organization has transformed from just a group for discussion into one that fosters service alongside dialogue. “It started in the basement of Walsh Hall as a place for discussion … and then it became more of a service-based and discussion- oriented initiative,” she said.  The group meets every other Wednesday at 7 p.m. in the South Lounge of Walsh Hall. Ekechukwu said all women are welcome to join the group’s dialogue and service.  “We are open to everyone. I think a common misconception with Shades is that it’s only for black women, and it’s not. It would be nice to see women of all races and sexualities,” Ekechukwu said.last_img read more

January 26, 2021 | |Post a Comment

first_imgEditor’s Note: A version of this report appeared in the March 6 edition of The Observer.Commencement Day at Saint Mary’s celebrates more than just the graduating class of 2014 — this year, the College will honor several alumnae and other women who have made a difference around the world.Judith Mayotte will deliver the Commencement address, according to a College press release. The humanitarian, professor, author and Emmy Award-winning producer will receive an honorary doctor of humanities degree at the ceremony.“Judith Mayotte is an internationally recognized humanitarian who has spent her life working to affect positive change for refugees and others,” College President Carol Ann Mooney said in a statement.Mayotte has served on several human rights-activist boards, including Refugees International, the Women’s Refugee Commission as chair, the Desmond Tutu Peace Foundation, the International Rescue Committee, Visionaries and the Global Ethics and Religion Forum, the press release stated.The Clinton administration appointed Mayotte in 1994 to the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Population, Refugees and Migration as a special adviser on refugee issues and policy. She has earned recognition from the Nuclear Age Peace Foundation, which honored her with the Foundation’s World Citizenship Award in 2009, according to the press release.Chemist Helen Murray Free will also receive an honorary doctorate at Commencement. Free conducted research on diagnostic testing that resulted in improvements for products in laboratory and home settings, according to the press release.“I am delighted to recognize two exceptional women this year with honorary degrees from Saint Mary’s College,” Mooney said in the release. “Their backgrounds and achievements fit perfectly with our dreams for our graduates.”Free and her late husband, biochemist Alfred Free, worked in medical diagnostics. Together, they researched and developed the first dip-and-read diagnostic test strips that quantify glucose levels in urine, the press release stated.Free has obtained seven patents and has received awards ranging from the 1980 American Chemical Society’s Garvan Medal to the 2010 National Medal of Technology and Innovation and the American Chemical Society’s 66th National Historic Chemical Landmark designation in 2010, according to the press release.Sara Belanger, a 1971 alumna, will receive the President’s Medal at Commencement, which “is presented rarely and exclusively to those who have offered exceptional contributions to the life of the College and the community,” the release stated. Belanger served on the Saint Mary’s Board of Trustees and the Alumnae Association Board of Directors.“Sarah has demonstrated her devotion to and love for Saint Mary’s College throughout the many years she has served the College as a valued member of the Board of Trustees and the Alumnae Association Board of Directors,” Mooney said.Earley is one of three chairs directing the College’s $80 million “Faith Always, Action Now” capital campaign. She and her husband, Notre Dame alumnus Tony Earley, agreed to match $1 million in the fundraising to renovate and expand Angela Athletic Facility.“The gift has been a catalyst for additional gifts toward what will be called the Angela Athletic & Wellness Complex, a facility that will be a central gathering spot that provides space for fitness and wellness, classes, varsity teams, intramurals and the Women’s Health Center,” the press release stated.Tags: 2014 Commencement, Awards, saint mary’slast_img read more

January 26, 2021 | |Post a Comment

first_imgNotre Dame physics professor Peter Garnavich received the 2015 Breakthrough Prize in Fundamental Physics on Nov. 9, for his work with the High-Z Supernova Search Team. The scientists and entrepreneurs that make up the Breakthrough Prize board awarded High-Z and another competing team of cosmological researchers for publishing paradigm-shifting evidence regarding the expansion of the universe.Garnavich said he was surprised to discover that the third iteration of the Breakthrough Prize would be awarded to High-Z.“I was reading the New York Times the morning after the prize was announced and I saw our team members and the competing team leader in their pictures and I said, ‘Oh, they’ve won another big award,’” Garnavich said. “Then I saw that physics received $3 million. It was only at the end of the article that I realized the entire team had also been named and would be receiving a share [of the prize].”Garnavich said when his team’s leaders, Brian P. Schmidt and Adam Riess, received the 2011 Nobel Prize for Physics for High-Z’s discovery the whole team enjoyed several days of celebration in Sweden. Garnavich said he admired the Swedes’ celebration of science and thought the Breakthrough Awards are an attempt to bring the spirit of celebrating science to the United States.The Breakthrough Prize was awarded to High-Z for publishing their research about stars in 1998, Garnavich said. The two competing teams, High-Z and the Supernova Cosmology Project, sought to analyze the expansion of the universe by collecting data on massive star explosions known as supernovae. Garnavich said his team used high-powered telescopes in places such as Arizona, Chile and in the Hubble Space Telescope to gather data on a category of supernovae with a uniform brightness known as “standard candles.”“Just like if you look at a street light and you would know that it is 300 watts, or something like that, you would know one that is fainter is actually further away,” he said. “So we use the same technique with these supernovae, if we know what their luminosity actually is. By the late ’80s to early ’90s it became clear that this particular type of supernova was a really excellent distance indicator.”Garnavich said when the two research teams compiled the necessary data from the “standard candle” supernovae for analysis in 1997, they theorized that it would be a measure of the degree of deceleration in the universe’s expansion.“We were finding — and scratching our heads — that we don’t see a deceleration, we actually see an acceleration,” Garnavich said. “The motion of the universe would be like if I threw this pen up in the air and it zoomed through the roof off into space. That would be quite surprising, and that was the level of surprise we had.”This mysterious accelerating force is referred to as “dark energy” and its identity is one of the major unanswered questions in physics, he said. Garnavich said High-Z’s discovery of the phenomenon has raised far more questions than they have answered.“It gets this general name ‘dark energy’ because it might not even be energy, it might even be extra dimensions,” Garnavich said. “It is a huge unknown, and we’re talking about three quarters of the universe and we have no idea what it is.”Garnavich said he estimates that science cannot explain 97 percent of the universe. Regardless, he said he remains undaunted by the infinite mysteries physics has yet to explain.“It keeps us in business.”Tags: Breakthrough Prize, Fundamental Physics, High-Z, Mark Zuckerberglast_img read more

January 26, 2021 | |Post a Comment

first_imgBeginning Saturday, Notre Dame’s dining halls will stay open during spring break for the first time in school history. In response to complaints from students who stay on campus during fall and spring breaks and are forced to rely on their own money to obtain food, Notre Dame Food Services has implemented a trial program from March 7 to 15 to determine if permanent changes should be made for the future.“The University recognizes that a number of students remain on campus for spring break,” Ann Hastings, senior communications specialist in the Office of Student Affairs, said, “Understanding the potential utilization of the dining hall over break can help Food Services and the University assess future plans as it relates to the dining hall schedule. Any student with a current meal plan is eligible to visit during this time.”According to Chris Abayasinghe, Director of Food Services, dining halls were previously closed during school breaks. The only campus meal options that remained open during breaks were fast food restaurants in LaFortune Student Center and various other establishments on campus, including Reckers and Au Bon Pain.“We listened to student feedback on meal needs,” Abayasinghe said, “The feedback that was shared centered around the number of students remaining on campus during the break and if their meal needs would be better served in a dining hall.”The open dining halls are especially convenient to those students who stay on campus during spring break to save money that would otherwise be spent on traveling. Meal swipes used during spring break will count towards students’ current meal plans at no additional cost to students.“Usage information will assist my department in evaluating the need, and number of students dining on campus during break periods,” Abayasinghe said. “Based on this data, we can then evaluate future operations during break periods.”North Dining Hall will be open Saturday for brunch from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. and dinner from 5 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. From Sunday to March 15, South Dining Hall will be open for brunch from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. and dinner from 5 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. Both dining halls will reopen for dinner and resume normal hours March 15.Tags: Dining Halls, Open, Spring Breaklast_img read more

January 26, 2021 | |Post a Comment

first_imgThe United States Department of Education’s Office of Civil Rights (OCR) said Tuesday it had opened an investigation Feb. 19 into the University’s handling of a sexual assault case last spring. The office also has four open investigations into the University for its handling of sexual harassment cases as far back as September 2013. In 2013, the OCR opened two investigations into the handling of two graduate students’ complaints of possible Title IX violations pertaining to sexual harassment.Susan Zhu The OCR launched the two most recent sexual harassment investigations against Notre Dame on Oct. 21, 2015, and Feb. 19, 2016. The latter harassment investigation has the same complainant as the sexual assault investigation launched the same day. All three of those cases — the most recent harassment cases and the sexual assault case — involve the same alleged perpetrator.According to University spokesperson Dennis Brown, the alleged perpetrator in question was dismissed from the University nearly a year ago.“… The University acted swiftly in this matter, and the accused student was dismissed from the University nearly a year ago, months before any Title IX complaint was filed with the OCR,” Brown said in an email Wednesday night.Laura Dunn, who represents both complainants, serves as Executive Director of SurvJustice, a Washington, D.C.-based nonprofit that offers free legal assistance to sexual violence survivors. In a phone conversation Wednesday, Dunn said the alleged perpetrator was dismissed from the University on disciplinary charges separate from her clients’ sexual harassment and sexual violence complaints. In a SurvJustice press release sent to The Observer on Tuesday, Dunn said the separate charges led to the alleged perpetrator being temporarily dismissed, allowing him the option to apply to return to the University at a later date. “[The University] allowed an identified repeat perpetrator to avoid a Title IX hearing on campus that could have led to expulsion so he would retain the option to re-enroll later — that’s unacceptable,” Dunn said in the release. Brown said the University deals with separate complaints against a single respondent on an individual basis. “If more than one complaint is made against a student, each incident is thoroughly examined,” Brown said. “ … A student with multiple complaints is therefore likely to have separate hearings. If the accused student is found responsible for a conduct violation, outcomes for that complaint will be assigned, up to and including dismissal. The best interests of the overall campus community may require implementing the dismissal of a student before all pending charges can be fully resolved, especially where the student may pose a threat to the community.”Brown said at the time the complainant’s case was being evaluated, the existing policy was not to conduct hearings if the accused student was no longer enrolled. He said that policy was amended last summer.“If a student is dismissed as the result of a hearing and additional conduct matters are pending, he or she would be subject to additional hearings immediately upon readmission,” he said. “It is important to note, however, that readmission to the University is not guaranteed.”Associate News Editor Kayla Mullen contributed to this report. Tags: Department of Education, Notre Dame Title IX violation, OCR, Office of Civil Rights, sexual assault, Sexual harassment, sexual violence, Title IX, Title IX investigationlast_img read more