October 19, 2020 | |Post a Comment

first_imgHe added that the government and the House were also expecting input from labor unions.The omnibus bill is aimed at creating jobs, improving the ease of doing business and stimulating economic growth, but it has triggered an outcry from law experts and the public.Indonesian Parliament Watch (Formappi) researcher Lucius Karus highlighted Article 170 of the bill, arguing that Jokowi must have an authoritarian spirit if the article had been proposed by the President himself.“If Jokowi proposed this concept, then this is proof that the President does have an authoritarian spirit and wants to gain power more,” Lucius told Kompas on Monday.Coordinating Political, Legal and Security Affairs Minister Mahfud MD said on Tuesday that there had been “a typo” in Article 170.“Yes, it’s actually a typo, which means that it’s a mistake. We all agreed, if we [refer] back to the basic theory of law, only laws can revoke laws, while government regulations can only regulate laws. That’s the principle,” he said.Political observer Jeirry Sumampow expressed doubts over Mahfud’s claim, saying if the article contained typographical mistakes, points in the article would not have been arranged coherently.Topics : Jokowi asked the public not to worry about the draft.“This is not yet a law, it’s just a draft bill,” he said.He also assured that the draft, which had been submitted to the House for deliberations, could be changed based on public input.“The point is that the government and the House are open for suggestions and to hear the wishes of the people. It is still too early, we still have three, four or maybe five months to finish it.” President Joko “Jokowi” Widodo has shot down allegations of him having the power to override laws thanks to an omnibus bill on job creation, saying that the president could not revoke laws through government regulation.“It’s impossible,” Jokowi told journalists at the Ritz Carlton Pacific Place in South Jakarta on Thursday, referring to Article 170 of the omnibus bill that stipulates such a provision for the government.The contentious article permits the government to revoke laws simply by issuing government regulations and consult with the House of Representatives in drawing up such regulations.last_img read more

October 19, 2020 | |Post a Comment

first_imgTwo Thai women convicted of smuggling methamphetamine into Bali have escaped a possible death sentence on the Indonesian holiday island after a court sentenced them to 16 years in jail.The district court in Bali’s capital Denpasar said Kasarin Khamkhao and Sanicha Maneetes — a janitor and an operator of a motorcycle rental shop in Thailand — had shown remorse for their crimes and deserved leniency.The verdict Wednesday comes four months after the pair were arrested by suspicious airport officials who found nearly a kilogram of methamphetamine hidden under their clothes after arriving on a flight from Bangkok. Muslim-majority Indonesia has some of the world’s toughest drug laws, including the death penalty for traffickers.At the time of their October arrest, police said the Thai women could face a firing squad if found guilty.Prosecutors, who had demanded a 19-year jail term, said Wednesday they may appeal against the lighter-than-requested sentences.The two Thais must also pay 1.0 billion rupiah (US$72,000) each in fines or have three more months tacked on to their sentence, the court said.Indonesia has slowed the pace of its executions in recent years despite broad public support for the penalty.A French drug trafficker briefly on death row saw his sentence reduced to 19 years on appeal.While death sentences are often reduced to long jail terms, Indonesia has executed foreign nationals in the past, including two Australian masterminds of the Bali Nine heroin gang who were shot in 2015.Topics :last_img read more

October 19, 2020 | |Post a Comment

first_imgThe funds, some of which are targeted to the world’s poorest nations, can be used for medical equipment or health services and will include expertise and policy advice, the bank said in a statement.The virus that erupted in central China in December has killed more than 3,000 worldwide and infected over 90,000 people.Malpass said the money — $8 billion of which is new — will go to countries that request help. The bank has been in contact with many member nations, but he did not specify which are likely to be the first to receive aid.”The point is to move fast. Speed is needed to save lives,” he said in a conference call. The World Bank unveiled a US$12 billion aid package on Tuesday that will provide fast-track funds to help countries combat the coronavirus outbreak.”The goal is to provide fast, effective action that responds to country needs,” World Bank President David Malpass told reporters. He said it is critical to “recognize the extra burden on poor countries” least equipped in the struggle to prevent the spread of the COVID-19 virus. “We want to make the best use of the World Bank’s extensive resources and global expertise and the historical knowledge of crises,” he said, citing similar crisis funding to combat the Ebola and Zika outbreaks in recent years.center_img Topics :last_img read more

October 19, 2020 | |Post a Comment

first_img“Every fundraising campaign has different targets to reach. The #SalingJaga community movement, for example, has managed to raise over Rp 1.2 billion of its Rp 2 billion target,” Fara told The Jakarta Post on Monday. Topics : As many Indonesians have had to make peace with the disconcerting reality of self-quarantining to curb the spread of the novel coronavirus disease CIVID-19, members of the public have taken to digital crowdfunding to raise funds for various stakeholders involved in the mitigation of the global pandemic.Crowdfunding platform Kitabisa has seen a surge in fundraising campaigns for COVID-19 mitigation since early this month, said Kitabisa spokesperson Fara Devara.As of Monday, the site had recorded a total of 513 such campaigns initiated by public figures, NGOs and members of the general public, with total donations amounting to Rp 24 billion (US$1.4 million), she said. Fara referred to a popular campaign on Kitabisa that aims to provide financial support to those who are affected by or are particularly vulnerable to the direct and indirect impacts of COVID-19 at a neighborhood level. The campaign especially aims to raise funds for informal workers “who don’t have the privilege of working from home”, such as app-based motorcycle taxi drivers, peddlers and traditional market vendors, as well as poor families.The funds they raise will be used to purchase, among other things, staple foods, masks, hand sanitizers and other protective equipment, according to the information on the campaign page. Fara went on to say that a number of campaigns had been successful in meeting their targets, while several others had surpassed them.“A fan club of the national soccer team has raised Rp 104 million, surpassing its original target of Rp 100 million,” Fara said. Digital crowdfunding seems to appeal to millennials – often comically stereotyped as a generation of apathetic individuals – as they have been among the most prominent fundraisers on the platform amid the COVID-19 pandemic.A campaign titled “Millennials Unite to Help COVID-19 Health Workers” kick-started by Syafi Djohan had raised nearly half of its Rp 100 million target as of Monday afternoon.Read also: COVID-19: Inadequate medical supplies take toll on lives of Indonesian medical workersFara went on to say that some funds collected through Kitabisa would be used to purchase medical supplies, including protective health gear, and food items that would then be distributed to designated referral centers for COVID-19 and health facilities across the country.Meanwhile, other portions of the funds would be distributed to low-income families, as well as workers in the informal sector who have experienced financial difficulties due to the health emergency. The funds would be distributed through local communities and NGOs, she said.A portion of the donation would also be used to support the sterilization of public spaces, such as houses of worship.“All funds will be distributed under direct supervision from Kitabisa,” Fara said.The COVID-10 pandemic has put a massive strain on Indonesia’s healthcare system, with reports of inadequate medical supplies and the deaths of hospital workers as patient numbers continue to surge.As of Monday, Indonesia had recorded 579 confirmed COVID-19 cases and 49 fatalities.last_img read more

October 19, 2020 | |Post a Comment

first_imgTopics : The government also added collective leave on Oct. 28 to commemorate the birth of Prophet Muhammad.“Shifting the collective leave to the end of the year was done in consideration that COVID-19 would be handled properly [by then]. In addition, at the end of the year, children will be on school break and families will have had enough time to plan vacations,” the statement continued.Two of Indonesia’s largest Islamic mass organizations, Nahdlatul Ulama and Muhammadiyah, have also advised people against participating in the mudik. The government, however, has not prohibited the mudik due to economic considerations. The government will instead disburse social aid to low-income families in hopes of dissuading people from taking part in the exodus. As of Thursday, the Health Ministry confirmed 3,293 cases of the pneumonia-like illness in Indonesia with 280 fatalities and 252 recoveries. Jakarta, the country’s outbreak epicenter, has confirmed 1,706 cases, with 142 fatalities and 82 recoveries. The government will push back Idul Fitri collective leave to December due to concerns that the annual exodus could cause further transmission of the novel coronavirus.Ramadan is expected to take place on April 23 to May 23. It has become customary for most Indonesians, especially those living in big cities, to visit their hometowns and gather with family during the long holiday near the end of the holy month.center_img The country expects some 20 million people to participate in the yearly tradition, with several having already left the capital for their hometowns despite the warnings of public health experts. While Idul Fitri will be observed, Coordinating Human Development and Culture Minister Muhadjir Effendy has moved the four-day Idul Fitri collective leave to Dec. 28-31, from May 26-29, nearing other year-end holidays.“This policy is a follow up to a directive from the President […] related to the no mudik appeal and the altering of the 2020 Idul Fitri collective leave,” Muhadjir said in a statement on Thursday.Read also: COVID-19: Jokowi considers adjusting Idul Fitri break, orders regions to be obedientlast_img read more

October 19, 2020 | |Post a Comment

first_imgDespite the increasing number of COVID-19 cases in Bali, the island has no intention of implementing large-scale social restrictions (PSBB) similar to those that are enforced in Greater Jakarta to stop the virus transmission.Bali Governor Wayan Koster claimed that Bali had yet to face a situation where such restrictions would be essential to apply, citing that the province had not even reached a high number of local transmissions.In a Monday press conference, Koster said implementing the large-scale restrictions would require at least two conditions.“First, the region would need to record many COVID-19 cases. Second, the spread of the virus would need to be high and have a big potential to cause fatalities and other misfortunes.“For Bali, referring to such requirements and my calculations […], it is not yet the time [for us to implement the restrictions]. We’re still quite far [from such conditions],” said Koster, who is an Indonesian Democratic Party of Struggle (PDIP) politician.Read also: COVID-19: Pekanbaru first area in Sumatra granted request to impose large-scale social restrictionsHe went on to say that Bali at the moment was not at the level of Jakarta, which is the epicenter of the COVID-19 outbreak in Indonesia with a high number of local transmissions. Koster said he was certain that the number of local transmissions in Bali was still low.Out of 81 cases recorded as of Monday, Koster claimed that only eight cases were caused by local transmission. “Most of the cases here are imported cases. Only eight people contracted COVID-19 through local transmission. I check the situation on a daily basis. The amount of local transmission is very small, in my opinion,” he added.Koster’s reasoning was based on what happened in Jakarta.Read also: COVID-19: West Java to request large-scale social restrictions for Greater Bandung“In Jakarta, the total number has reached 2,000 cases, and mostly from local transmission. “The capital is also connected with neighboring areas with high cases such as Banten, West Java — including Bogor and Bekasi — as well as Central Java,” he said.Koster claimed it was relatively easy to control the spread of COVID-19 in Bali as it is a small island. Nevertheless, his administration has applied limited access at all gates of Bali.The province is also focusing on repatriating thousands of Balinese migrant workers, considering that many COVID-19 cases were found in migrant workers who had just come home from working abroad.Topics :last_img read more

October 19, 2020 | |Post a Comment

first_imgHe went on to say that the contraction was expected to continue in the third quarter of this year, but at a much better rate, before a recovery would begin in the fourth quarter. Several regions have started to gradually phase out PSBB policies this month.The easing restrictions was hoped to encourage more mobility among the public and drive economic activity, Bank Mandiri industry and regional research department head Dendi Ramdani added.“Given such reasoning, we project that the contraction in the third quarter will reach 0.95 percent, before [the economy] bounces back to grow by 1.62 percent in the fourth quarter,” he said.The recovery in the fourth quarter, however, would only be possible if there was no second wave of the outbreak in the country, as another increase in the number of confirmed cases would only lead to a second period of PSBB and slow down the economy again, he said.Should the recovery go smoothly, Dendi projected the country’s economy would grow by 0.02 percent this year and by 4.43 percent in 2021. This compares with the government’s baseline scenario of 2.3 percent economic growth and a 0.4 percent contraction under the worst-case scenario.Indonesia has recorded 41,431 confirmed COVID-19 cases as of Wednesday, officially cementing its position as the country with the highest number of confirmed cases in Southeast Asia and surpassing that of Singapore, which recorded 41,216 cases. Topics : Major lender Bank Mandiri expects Indonesia’s economy to contract in the second and third quarter of this year following restrictions imposed on social and economic activities since April to contain the spread of the coronavirus.The state-owned bank’s chief economist, Andry Asmoro, said on Wednesday that he predicted the country’s gross domestic product (GDP) to contract by 3.44 percent in the second quarter of this year, more than the government’s projection of a 3.1 percent contraction.“The biggest contraction will happen in the second quarter, because during that time, the government started to impose restrictions to contain the spread of COVID-19,” he said, referring to the large-scale social restrictions (PSBB) enforced in several regions across Indonesia.last_img read more

October 19, 2020 | |Post a Comment

first_imgRead also: Explainer: What’s the new coronavirus saliva test, and how does it work?Previously, Transportation Minister Budi Karya Sumadi said that he had asked the Finance Ministry to subsidize rapid tests for travelers, especially public transportation users.People seeking to travel by airplanes and long-distance trains are required to submit negative COVID-19 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) or rapid test results before being allowed to board.“We are currently asking the Finance Ministry to subsidize rapid tests for those who travel regularly,” he said earlier this month as quoted by kompas.com.Rapid tests, while faster, are less accurate than PCR tests, with a high possibility of false positives as well as false negatives.Topics : The Health Ministry has issued a circular setting a price ceiling of Rp 150,000 (US$10.41) for COVID-19 rapid tests, following numerous complaints over the high prices of such tests.The circular, dated Monday and signed by the ministry’s director-general for health services, Bambang Wibowo, states that all health facilities must adhere to the price ceiling.“The government needs to step in on the issue of rapid test prices so that the public do not feel like they are being taken advantage of for profit,” Bambang said in the circular.last_img read more

October 19, 2020 | |Post a Comment

first_img“Unfortunately, Beijing has continued systematically to obstruct travel to the Tibetan Autonomous Region and other Tibetan areas by US diplomats and other officials, journalists and tourists, while PRC officials and other citizens enjoy far greater access to the United States,” Pompeo said in a statement.Pompeo restricted visas to Chinese officials determined to be “substantially involved” in the exclusion of foreigners from Tibetan areas.The State Department declined to name the officials or say how many people were affected, citing US confidentiality laws.Chinese foreign ministry spokesman Zhao Lijian expressed China’s “firm opposition” to the move and urged the US to “immediately stop interfering in China’s internal affairs through Tibet-related issues”. ‘A clear message’The International Campaign for Tibet, a rights advocacy group close to the Dalai Lama, welcomed the implementation of the law.”The US is sending Beijing a clear message that it will face consequences for its human rights abuses and continued isolation of Tibet from the outside world,” said the group’s president, Matteo Mecacci.The campaign said it saw momentum, pointing to a recent joint call by 57 European parliamentarians from 19 countries to set up their own version of the Reciprocal Access to Tibet Act.A British MP has also introduced similar legislation.”China’s oppression of the Tibetan people won’t stop tomorrow even with this law’s implementation,” Mecacci said.”But international pressure on the Chinese government to open up Tibet to the outside world is a vital step toward bringing justice and human rights back to Tibet.”The US action comes one day after the 85th birthday of the Dalai Lama, who has spent most of his life in exile in India.While the Dalai Lama is believed to be in good health, the charismatic monk has reduced his once constant travel, raising fears that the spotlight on Tibet will fade without him. “In response to the wrong actions of the US, China has decided to impose visa restrictions on US personnel who behave badly on Tibet-related issues,” he said, warning of further damage to US-China relations and cooperation.Amid high tension with China, the United States has increasingly been issuing such visa sanctions, earlier taking action over Beijing’s clampdown on free expression in Hong Kong and its incarceration of some one million Uighurs and other mostly Muslim Turkic minorities.The Tibet action comes under a 2018 law passed by Congress that aims to pressure China over its tight restrictions in the Himalayan region.Beijing says its troops “peacefully liberated” Tibet in 1951, but many Tibetans accuse the central government of religious repression and eroding their culture.Human rights groups say that Tibetans live under strict surveillance with the threat of jail or abuse for any signs of a non-Chinese identity, including possessing images of the Dalai Lama, their exiled spiritual leader.Beijing has largely barred foreign journalists from visiting Tibet since 2008, when the region experienced a wave of self-immolations as protests, and has not responded to US requests to set up a consulate in the regional capital Lhasa.By contrast, the law notes that Chinese nationals admitted to the United States face no restrictions on visiting any part of the country. The United States and China imposed visa restrictions on each other in tit-for-tat moves over their disagreement on Tibet, adding fuel to the diplomatic fire between the superpowers.China announced Wednesday its curbs on people from the US who “behave badly” on Tibet-related issues, in retaliation for American curbs unveiled a day before.Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said Tuesday he was taking action against an unspecified number of officials under a new US law that presses China to let Americans visit the far west region, renewing a call for “meaningful autonomy” in the predominantly Buddhist area. Topics :last_img read more

October 19, 2020 | |Post a Comment

first_imgBanten authorities will relax some restrictions during this extension of PSBB, particularly on activities with a low risk of virus transmission.South Tangerang deputy mayor Benyamin Davine said the administration had decided to extend PSBB because many residents were still not complying with health protocols that would prevent the further spread of COVID-19. He said South Tangerang would only prepare for a “new normal” period – a phrase used to describe Indonesia’s post-pandemic easing of restrictions – if 90 percent of the area’s residents were complying with health protocols.Read also: Jakarta, Bali prepare to welcome conventions despite rising COVID-19 cases The Banten administration has decided to extend COVID-19 mobility restrictions in Greater Tangerang for the sixth time, until July 26.Banten Governor Wahidin Halim announced the decision following a discussion of the efficacy of large-scale social restrictions (PSBB) with local leaders in Tangerang regency, Tangerang city and South Tangerang.”We need more time for residents to fully adapt to new habits [that comply with health protocols],” Wahidin said on Monday. “However, we’ve made some exceptions, such as reopening places of worship as long as they adhere to the required health protocols,” Benyamin added.Despite the relaxation of some restrictions, governor Wahidin reminded residents to adhere to PSBB restrictions.”We don’t want the relaxations to cause residents to think that the situation has returned to normal and that they can behave like they did before the pandemic,” he said.As of Monday, Banten had recorded a total of 1,593 COVID-19 infections, with 81 fatalities and 1,090 recoveries.The province has seen a decrease in new COVID-19 cases over the past two weeks, Banten COVID-19 task force head Ati Pramudji Hastuti said.”Banten has also recorded fewer ODP and PDP [suspected cases] and COVID-19 patients being treated at hospitals. We also have higher recovery and testing rates,” Ati said, as quoted by tempo.co. (nal)Topics :last_img read more