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January 18, 2021 | |Post a Comment

first_img View Comments Dominic Cooper(Photo by Johan Persson) Broadway alum Dominic Cooper back on stage as a debauched 17th century rake? We’re in! He will headline The Libertine, penned by Stephen Jeffreys and directed by Terry Johnson, which is set to play the Theatre Royal Bath this summer before beginning previews at the West End’s Theatre Royal Haymarket on September 22. Opening night is scheduled for September 27 and the limited engagement will play through December 3.John Wilmot, the second Earl of Rochester (Cooper) is a charismatic poet, playwright and rake with a legendary appetite for excess. Yet this most ardent of hedonists is forced to reconsider everything he thinks and feels when a chance encounter with an actress at the Playhouse sends him reeling. With flair and wit, this wild romp through 1670s London offers an incisive critique of life in an age of excess.Cooper appeared on Broadway in The History Boys; other stage credits include Mother Clap’s Molly House and Phedre. His numerous film credits include The History Boys, The Duchess, My Week with Marilyn, Mamma Mia, Captain America: The First Avenger and the upcoming Preacher. Full casting will be announced later.last_img read more

January 18, 2021 | |Post a Comment

first_img Star Files View Comments School of Rock – The Musical Alex Brightman Related Showscenter_img Alex Brightman(Photo: Bruce Glikas) Show Closed This production ended its run on Jan. 20, 2019 School of Rock star and former Broadway.com vlogger Alex Brightman is set to host the second annual Shubert Foundation High School Theatre Festival on March 7. The event, which showcases theater education in NYC public high schools, will spotlight over 100 students performing on a Broadway stage. It will be held at the Winter Garden Theatre, home of School of Rock.The Festival features students from five NYC high schools performing excerpts from their winter productions for top industry professionals. The young actors will perform selections from The Laramie Project, Fences, Beauty and the Beast, A Raisin in the Sun and Miss Saigon.The productions were selected from over 20 across NYC by a panel of theater professionals and arts educators. The Festival is sponsored by The Shubert Foundation in partnership with the New York City Department of Education.Break a leg, everyone!last_img read more

January 18, 2021 | |Post a Comment

first_imgChristian Borle & Sutton Foster(Photos: Bruce Glikas) A surprising guest is accompanying Sutton Foster to Stars Hollow. Fellow Tony winner—and ex-husband—Christian Borle will join her in the upcoming Netflix revival of Gilmore Girls. Also on board is Tony nominee and Disaster! star Kerry Butler.The trio, according to Entertainment Weekly, will play three stars of Stars Hollow: The Musical, featured in the third episode of the new season. Fun Home Tony winner Jeanine Tesori will pen the score for the show-within-a-show. Borle and Foster are familiar with singing her work; the two starred in Thoroughly Modern Millie together, and Foster went on to headline Shrek and Violet on Broadway.Upon the initial announcement of Foster’s involvement, it was speculated that she would reprise her role as Michelle Simms from the ABC Family series Bunheads, which, like Gilmore Girls, was created by Amy Sherman-Palladino.The Tony-winning duo celebrated their wedding in 2006 following their stint in Thoroughly Modern Millie. They separated in 2010, but have continued to sing each other’s praises. “There’s a reason we got divorced, but there’s a reason we got married,” Borle told Broadway.com back in 2012. “She an unbelievable woman. She’s the best.” Borle has also admitted to becoming obsessed with Gilmore Girls while with Foster.A Tony winner for Something Rotten! and Peter and the Starcatcher, Borle will return to the Broadway stage this fall as Marvin in the revival of Falsettos. He previously appeared on the small screen in NBC’s Smash, The Sound of Music Live! and Peter Pan Live!. Butler earned a Tony nomination for her performance in Xanadu; her additional credits include Catch Me If You Can, Hairspray and Rock of Ages.Borle and Butler are the latest addition who did not appear in the original series. They join fellow newcomers Stacey Oristano—a Bunheads alum—and Mae Whitman, who starred opposite headliner Lauren Graham in Parenthood. Several leading, featured and recurring players from the original series (including Tony winner Kelly Bishop) are slated to return for the Netflix revival, with the notable exception of Melissa McCarthy. View Commentslast_img read more

January 18, 2021 | |Post a Comment

first_img View Comments Before appearing in The Glass Menagerie on Broadway next spring, American Horror Story’s Finn Wittrock will join the Daniel Craig and David Oyelowo-led Othello off-Broadway. Directed by Sam Gold, the previously reported production is set to play a limited engagement November 22 through January 18, 2017. Opening night is scheduled for December 12 at New York Theatre Workshop.The company will also include David Wilson Barnes (Bridge of Spies), Marsha Stephanie Blake (Orange is the New Black), Rachel Brosnahan (House of Cards), Blake DeLong (Natasha, Pierre & The Great Comet of 1812), Glenn Fitzgerald (Dirty Sexy Money), Slate Holmgren (King Lear), Anthony Michael Lopez (The Penalty), Matthew Maher (The Flick), Nikki Massoud (Zealot) and Kyle Vincent Terry (Robin Hood).Shakespeare’s Othello tackles the universal and timeless themes of jealousy, betrayal, racism and the lure of power. The classic was most notably fairly recently seen off-Broadway in 2009 with John Ortiz in the title role and the late screen and stage legend Philip Seymour Hoffman as Iago, directed by Peter Sellars.The production will feature scenic design by Andrew Lieberman, costume design by David Zinn, lighting design by Jane Cox, sound design by Bray Poor and fight direction by Thomas Schall. Finn Wittrock(Photo: Jason Kempin/Getty Images)last_img read more

January 17, 2021 | |Post a Comment

first_imgBy Sharon OmahenUniversity of GeorgiaAfter growing up on a farm where he was taught to kill grass,Georgia Gov. Sonny Perdue says he’s had to learn to embraceevents that encourage people to grow and maintain grasses.”I still have a little difficulty adjusting to the context ofthis kind of event,” said Perdue as he welcomed more than 800turfgrass professionals to the University of Georgia TurfgrassField Day today. “I grew up on a farm in Houston County,” Perdue said. “And Ispent all of my formative years trying to kill grass. And herey’all are trying to grow it and spread it.”Held on the UGA campus in Griffin, Ga., the field day providesUGA scientists an outlet to share research-based information withmembers of the turf industry and homeowners.”Today we’re seeing the science behind the growth this industryhas brought to Georgia,” Perdue said. “It takes good basicresearch behind breeding new varieties of turfgrass to make ourstate even more beautiful.”As the population of Georgia continues to grow, the governoremphasized the importance of keeping the state beautiful.”You don’t hear people say they want to retire to the north,” hesaid. “They are coming to our state, and they are going to keepon coming. We know the pressure this puts on our state and on ourenvironment and our landscapes, and we need dedicatedprofessionals like the ones here today to help us maintain thebeauty of our state.”The UGA Turfgrass Field Day primarily attracts professionals fromthe turf industry: landscape professionals, golf coursesuperintendents and sod producers.”Field days like this one are designed as educational outreachefforts and this one focuses on improving knowledge of turfgrasspractices,” said Clint Waltz, a UGA Extension Service turfgrassspecialist.”Our goal is to educate the public on how to manage their turfgrass, whether it’s on a golf course, park or front lawn, whilepositively impacting the environment,” Waltz said.Behind the broiler and cotton industries, the urbanagriculture industryranks third in Georgia list of money-making commodities. The 2003Farm Gate Value for turf grass in Georgia exceeded $151 million andaccounted for more than 47,000 acres of the state’s productionland.Georgia’s 650 golf courses and related businesses employ more than20,000 people and contribute more than $2.7 billion to the state’seconomy.The governor concluded his field-day welcome by saying he’s afirsthand tester of new turfgrass varieties bred by researcherswith the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.”We’re demonstrating some of the new turfs, the new Bermudahybrids, on the lawn of the mansion in Atlanta,” he said. “I’mlooking forward to driving the city folks around and letting themsee it.”last_img read more

January 17, 2021 | |Post a Comment

first_imgNorth of a line from Columbia County to Hall County to Fannin County, levels are at or below the 5th percentile. At the 5th percentile, we would expect more moisture in the soils 95 out of 100 years in late June.Farm ponds, especially ones not fed by springs, are showing the lack of rain. Many ponds didn’t receive adequate recharge during the winter and entered the summer already low. Through October, Georgia’s best chance for widespread drought relief will be tropical disturbances. The tropics usually don’t become active until late summer. More drought information can be found at www.georgiadrought.org. Automated weather data across Georgia is at www.georgiaweather.net. Daily rainfall from CoCoRaHS is available at www.cocorahs.org. USGS data is at ga.water.usgs.gov. Water conservation information is available at www.conservewatergeorgia.net. With June temperatures routinely hitting the 90s and little rain so far this summer, drought conditions have worsened across Georgia.Conditions in the western half of south and middle Georgia have deteriorated the most. A few weeks ago, these regions were classified as abnormally dry. They are now in severe drought.Severe drought now exists west and north of a line crossing Lowndes, Cook, Tift, Turner, Crisp, Dooly, Houston, Bibb, Jones, Baldwin, Hancock, Glascock, Warren, McDuffie and Richmond counties. It includes Albany, Atlanta, Augusta, Columbus, Macon and Rome. Severe drought conditions occur about once in 20 years.Much of north Georgia is in extreme drought. This includes an area north and east of a line crossing Lincoln, Wilkes, Taliaferro, Greene, Morgan, Walton, Gwinnett, Forsyth, Dawson, Gilmer and Fannin counties. The cities are Athens, Blairsville, Clayton, Cumming, Gainesville and Madison. Extreme drought conditions occur about once in 50 years.Moderate drought conditions exists in Echols, Lanier, Berrien, Irwin, Ben Hill, Wilcox, Pulaski, Dodge, Bleckley, Twiggs, Wilkinson, Laurens, Washington, Johnson, Jefferson, Burke, Jenkins, Screven and Effingham counties. Moderate drought conditions occur about once in 10 years.Clinch, Atkinson, Coffee, Telfair, Wheeler, Treutlen, Emanuel, Candler, Bullock, Evans, Liberty, Bryan and Chatham counties are in mild drought, which occurs about once in seven years.Abnormally dry counties are Camden, Charlton, Ware, Bacon, Jeff Davis, Montgomery, Toombs, Tattnall, Long and McIntosh.Currently, the only counties not in drought are Glynn, Brantley, Pierce, Appling and Wayne. However, a hot, dry July could cause drought to develop rapidly.The biggest concern over the next several weeks will be stream flows and soil moisture. Almost half of the U.S. Geological Survey stream gauges across Georgia are at record low flows as of June 25. This analysis includes only gauges with a minimum of 30 years of records. It doesn’t include gauges on the Chattahoochee River below the Buford Dam or gauges on the Savannah River.Streams at daily record low flows include the Chattahoochee River near Cornelia, the Etowah River at Canton, the Notteley River near Blairsville, the Chattoga River near Clayton, the Broad River near Bell, the Flint River near Carsonville, Oakfield, Albany and Newton, the Oconee River at Athens, Milledgeville and Dublin, the Ocmulgee River near Jackson and Lumber City, the Ohoopee River near Reidsville, the Withlacoochee River near Quitman and Ichawaynochaway Creek near Milford.Several streams are at or below their 7Q10 flow value, which is the 7-day flow that has only a 10 percent chance of occurring in any given year. When it does happen, it typically occurs in September or October, when stream flows are normally at their lowest for the year. Seeing streams at or below the 7Q10 in late June indicates the severity of the current conditions. Streams currently below their 7Q10 are the Broad River near Bell, the Little River near Washington, the Ocmulgee River near Jackson, the Oconee River at Dublin, the Flint River at Carsonville and Ichawaynochaway Creek at Milford. Streams slightly above their 7Q10 are the Middle Oconee at Athens and the Chattooga River near Clayton.Soil moisture levels are extremely low north of a line from Seminole County to Screven County. North of a line from Chattahoochee County to Richmond County the levels are at or below the 10th percentile. At this percentile, we would expect more moisture in the soils 90 out of 100 years in late June.last_img read more

January 17, 2021 | |Post a Comment

first_imgBy Stephanie SchupskaUniversity of GeorgiaAmericans eat $1.1 billion worth of bananas each year, or as much as 33 pounds per person. Almost all of it comes from foreign countries. University of Georgia researchers are working on ways to get Georgia a slice of that banana cash pie.Georgia may be known for peaches, but pecan is the state’s top fruit and nut commodity, followed by blueberries and then peaches. While it may seem far-fetched to add bananas to that list now, Georgia is a fine place to grow bananas for food or as a landscape plant, says Greg Fonsah, an economist with the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.“If our research succeeds, bananas will be like other fruits such as blueberries and strawberries,” said Fonsah, who heads the UGA banana project. “It will be our new commodity, and at least part of that $1.1 billion spent to import bananas to the United States would be going back to boost our economy.”American bananas — worth $13 million annually — are currently grown on 1,500 acres in Hawaii and 500 acres in Florida. The types produced in Florida are ethnic varieties, unlike the ones typically found in grocery stores.Georgia bananas could be grown in coastal and southern areas of the state, he said. These areas have a subtropical climate much like Israel, South Africa and some Asian countries that successfully grow and export bananas to the U.S., which imports 31 percent of the world’s bananas.“Globally, banana and plantain are the fourth most important crops in terms of food security and value,” Fonsah said.The UGA banana collaborative team includes plant pathologists Alex Csinos and Pingsheng Ji and Fulbright scholar Daouda Kone from Cocody-Abidjan University, Cote D’Ivoire. CAES horticulturist Gerard Krewer has helped, too.The team is working with 35 different banana varieties at the Bamboo Farm and Coastal Garden in Savannah, Ga. They’re trying to find the best banana varieties for Georgia’s climate and to discover which diseases Georgia producers will have to fight once they grow bananas commercially.The work is already paying off.A disease called black leaf spot was confirmed for the first time in Georgia last year at the Savannah research plots. Caused by the fungus Deightoniella torulosa, the disease causes problems in major banana-producing countries in Central America.“Black leaf spot affects the fruit and makes it get rotten very fast,” Fonsah said. “It looks so bad cosmetically, like a big black scar on the banana’s body.”The disease can affect bananas while they’re still in the field. But its economic hit comes when it shows up as spots on the banana’s skin en route to marketing outlets. Cosmetic appearance is how consumers judge banana quality.“Ultimately, consumers reject the fruit, and if they reject the fruit, you’re losing a lot of money,” Fonsah said.Now that black leaf spot has been discovered in Georgia, the team, Fonsah said, will continue to trace other possible diseases and other growing problems. He hopes to compile a book to help guide Georgia farmers on how to plant and market their bananas.Before joining CAES, Fonsah worked for two decades with multinational companies such as Del Monte Fresh Produce, Lapanday Food Co. in the Philippines and Aloha Farms Inc. in Hawaii, where he initiated their banana export market to Japan, Dubai and Hong Kong. He has also served as a banana and marketing consultant in many countries.(Stephanie Schupska is a news editor for the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.)last_img read more

January 17, 2021 | |Post a Comment

first_imgBy Sharon DowdyUniversity of GeorgiaUniversity of Georgia scientists are using DNA technology and old-fashioned animal instinct to find the best ways to control wood-destroying carpenter ants.“Carpenter ants are a major pest problem nationwide,” said Dan Suiter, an entomologist with the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. “They cause significant damage each year.”Wood-chewersUnlike termites, carpenter ants don’t eat wood. They chew it. “They expand it into a nest gallery that looks like Swiss cheese,” Suiter said. “Then they live in the galleries.” Carpenter ants are big and black and live mostly in trees, he said. In the Northeast, carpenter ants destroy more wood than termites.Based on the UGA Griffin, Ga., campus, Suiter and CAES genetic entomologist Tracie Jenkins test baits designed to kill the ants. They are monitoring 20 sites in the local city park because the hardwood trees there replicate those found in a typical suburban neighborhood. They monitor the test sites at night when the ants forage for food.Huge and nocturnal“During the day, they live up in the leaves and in hollowed-out tree holes and knotholes,” Jenkins said. “At night, they come down, and you can literally see the well-worn foraging trails they habitually use.”Ant samples are taken from the park back to the laboratory where Jenkins uses DNA biotechnology to determine the ants’ lineage or family relationships, which form colony structure.“We assume each colony has a single queen, so knowing the queen’s maternal fingerprint will help us track her progenies’ movements,” she said. “The winged ants are the ones that mate. We’ve discovered colonies that are physically far apart can actually be descended from the same female queen.”Once a colony’s genetic structure and movements are known, Suiter and Jenkins can develop management strategies and determine which baits are effective.Families don’t fightTo find out if colonies are related, Suiter said, you can also do what he calls “ant behavioral studies.”He places ants from different sites in a Petri dish. The ants that fight each other are not related.“The ants have colony-specific smells on their bodies,” Suiter said. Ants pick fights by using their antennae to spar, he said. Then it gets aggressive. “They grab each other by a leg, and one will take another’s leg off,” he said. “Then they lock jaws and do a circle-dance.”Deadly acidThen somebody brings out the heavy artillery.“Carpenter ants can spray formic acid,” Suiter said. “So, the first one to turn around and spray formic acid is the winner. It’s like getting a face full of tear gas, and they have to be very irritated to do it.”After six months have passed, Suiter and Jenkins will return to the test sites at the park. If they find ants, they will again take samples and run DNA analyses to determine if the ants are from the same colony that initially occupied the site.“We want to eliminate the ants in a colony by using the baits, then go back and see if the ants that come back are from the same colony,” he said. “To truly know how well the baits work, we have to know if the same colony of ants or a different colony move in after we eliminate the first colony.”To see carpenter ants, go outside after 9 p.m. armed with a flash light. “You may see a couple in the daytime, but you’ll see hundreds if not thousands at night,” Suiter said.last_img read more

January 17, 2021 | |Post a Comment

first_imgLandowners, farmers or sportsmen who want to increase the value and benefits of the land they own, manage or hunt should attend the 2009 Agroforestry and Wildlife Field Day Sept.17 at the University of Georgia campus in Griffin, Ga. Federal and state experts in the fields of wildlife and forest management will be on hand to present the most up-to-date research-based information. The field day will include both management recommendations and real-life technique demonstrations. More than 25 topics will be discussed, including food plots, pond management, timber marketing, prescribed burning, cost-share programs, invasive insects, disease and plants and wild turkey, dove, quail, deer and small game management.Participants will be transported to field day sites via tram and will receive a booklet with topics and speaker information. Continuing education credits in forest pest control, right-of-way and logger will be available.This event is sponsored by the Georgia Forestry Commission, the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, UGA Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources, Georgia Department of Natural Resources-Wildlife Resources Division, U.S. Department of Agriculture Natural Resources Conservation Service and Fort Valley State University.Registration costs $30, which includes the field day program and lunch. For more information, visit the AWFD Web site at www.caes.uga.edu/events/awfd09/. University of Georgialast_img read more

January 17, 2021 | |Post a Comment

first_imgBy Judy HarrisonUniversity of GeorgiaJust because your mother and her mother before her treated food a certain way doesn’t mean it’s the safest way. It’s time to bust some common myths about keeping food safe at home. Myth: Once a hamburger turns brown in the middle it is cooked to a safe temperature. Fact: You cannot use visual cues to determine whether food has been cooked to a safe internal temperature. The only way to tell for sure is to use a food thermometer. Ground meats should reach at least 160 degrees Fahrenheit. Ground poultry should reach at least 165 F.Myth: Lemon juice and salt will clean and sanitize a cutting board.Fact: Instead of using lemon juice and salt, to kill bacteria, people should use a solution of chlorine bleach and water. Sanitizing is the process of reducing the number of microorganisms that are on a properly cleaned surface to a safe level, reducing the risk of foodborne illness. The most effective way to do this is with a solution of unscented chlorine bleach and water. To clean and sanitize a cutting board, first wash it with hot, soapy water and rinse. Then prepare a solution of 1 tablespoon chlorine bleach per gallon of water or 1 teaspoon of chlorine bleach per quart of water. Let the bleach solution stand on the surface for at least one minute, either by spraying it on or immersing the board in the solution. Allow the board to air-dry or dry it with a clean paper towel. Myth: You should not put hot food in the refrigerator.Fact: Hot food can be placed directly in the refrigerator. A large pot of soup or stew should be divided into several smaller portions in shallow containers for quicker cooling in the refrigerator. Bacteria can multiply rapidly when foods are left at room temperature for more than two hours. Always follow the two-hour rule, and refrigerate perishable foods at 40 F or colder before it expires. If the food is left out where temperatures are 90 F or hotter, refrigerate foods after an hour. Myth: Putting chicken in a colander and rinsing it with water will remove bacteria like salmonella.Fact: Rinsing poultry will not remove all the bacteria. In fact, rinsing can spread the raw juices around your sink, onto your countertops and around your kitchen. Cross-contamination can then be a problem. Other foods can become contaminated with bacteria when they come in contact with these juices. Thorough cooking kills bacteria. Bacteria in raw meat and poultry are killed when the food is cooked to a safe internal temperature. Cook poultry until the internal temperature reaches at least 165 F. Save yourself the messiness of rinsing.To keep your food safe, remember these steps: clean, separate, cook and chill. That’s a fact!(Judy Harrison is a food safety specialist with University of Georgia Cooperative Extension.)last_img read more