August 4, 2020 | |Post a Comment

first_imgBy Muriel J. Smith RED BANK – They may not all be out there in Santa outfits anymore, but the volunteers and employees of the Salvation Army Red Kettle campaign are as diligent as ever in striving to meet this year’s goal of raising $100,000 to support Christmas programs and services throughout the entire year.This year’s Red Kettle Drive was launched by the Red Bank Corps two weeks ago, and kettles can be found at various locations throughout the Monmouth County areas, according to Lt. Brennen Hinzman, Commanding Officer of Red Bank Corps.“The work done here throughout the year cannot be done without your contri- butions this season,” Hinzman said. Staffing the kettles are either an employee or a volunteer, ringing a bell and engaging the shoppers, Hinzman explained. He noted there are individuals and groups who enjoy standing kettles every year and faithfully help the Salvation Army to meet that year’s monetary goal.For both employees and volunteers, the Corps workers can opt for wearing a Santa outfit or identifying themselves in plain clothes wearing the apron or pin synonymous with the Salvation Army. Bell Ringers also can be as individualized as they’d like, within the limits of the places where they are standing. Which means, there might be a bell ringer dancing to a boombox she’s carrying or dancing in front of his Red Kettle tripod, or, like the volunteers in Little Silver, wearing their Santa outfits because they like that the best. “Every area is different,” said Jesabel Cruz, office manager and caseworker in the Salvation Army office at 180 Newman Springs Road.“We love our volunteers because they are committed and give of their time,” the Corps commander said, adding, “but we also enjoy being able to provide temporary seasonal employment, giving people the opportunity to earn some much needed income. Many of the workers have their confidence restored, as they are entrusted with a duty that gives back to their own communities.”One such worker is the newest employee for the Red Bank unit, Joseph Kuca, who can usually be found in front of the ACME store in Lincroft, except on Wednesdays. Kuca wrote a letter to the Salvation Army this Thanksgiving, thanking them for giving him the emotional lift he needed at a difficult time in his life, and praising the Salvation Army members for “allowing me to be a part of your family.”Kuca thanked the Army for resupplying his pantry and said until that time, “I couldn’t remember when I’d had eggs last. You too touched my heart with your kindness.” Kuca thanked every individual member of the Army who welcomed him with warmth, compassion and respect when he came for assistance, and told them “your collective humanity made all the difference to me at a time when I was at my lowest. It buoyed me … up to go forward and to face the storm with renewed courage. As your nineteenth century poster proclaimed, ‘A man may be down, but he’s never out!’ ”Kuca was quick to spread the good will he himself had received by joining the Red Kettle Drive. But even here, he went on, doing the work for the drive “has been truly the single most rewarding experience that I have ever known, truly. The positive response of the public, their sharing of stories of positive, life altering, life affirming experiences, realized through contact with the Salvation Army, in their lives, is most heartening. It warms my heart.”Kuca concluded that while he may never become a soldier in the corps, “but I have always been, and ever shall be, a most devoted advocate and Camp Follower of the Salvation Army. You folks truly change lives!”Marylynn Richner couldn’t agree more. The Red Bank resident has been a bell ringer for more than 50 years, star ting with her mother almost immediately after joining the Army. Practicing Baptists, Richner and her mother picked up her sister who was attending a Salvation Army service, and were so moved by the service Richner immediately wanted to join the Army. She’s been a soldier ever since.Always in Monmouth Mall, placidly sitting in her Salvation Army uniform just outside the mall entrance to Macy’s, Richner says she does the work every year because “I like to do the Lord’s work and He’s given me the strength to do it here.That’s a good enough reason for continuing.”The charming little lady with the soft voice and quick smile is at her post six hours a day, five days a week and loves it. “In fact,” she adds, “I can’t see anything I don’t like about it.” Sometimes, only a few people may come to drop coins or bills in her red kettle; other days she might be saying thank you and “God Bless You” to a 100 or more.Always ready to help someone in need, Richner said she’s also trained at the senior building where she lives to respond to emergencies such as floods or other disasters, assisting the fire or police department. Retired from the McCormick Company in Freehold since the plant closed many years ago, she loves her bell ringing job the most because “I’m able to help families in need.”Last year, over 1,500 people received assistance from the Red Bank Army’s food program, 650 households received holiday assistance for Thanksgiving and Christmas, and more than 500 children received Christmas gifts, which usually including apparel and footwear, from the Angel Tree Tag Program. Additional services included various children’s programs, social services and more than 400 meals provided through the Corps’ Bread of Life Community Kitchen. Funds raised during the Red Kettle Campaign are used to sustain the programs and services throughout the year.The Red Kettle drive started in the 19th century, when Capt. Joseph McFee launched it in San Francisco to provide Christmas dinner for the destitute. Since then it has evolved into one of the most recognizable and important charitable campaigns in the country.The Salvation Army itself is an evangelical part of the Christian Church established in England in 1865, and has been supporting those in need in this country for the past 130 years. The services of the Army ranged from providing food for the hungry, relief for disaster victims, assistance to the disabled, outreach to the elderly and ill, as well as clothing and shelter for the homeless and opportunities for the underprivileged. Eighty-two cents of every dollar the Salvation Army spends supports these services in 5,000 communities across the country.last_img read more

August 3, 2020 | |Post a Comment

first_img Of those, 24 per cent are from B.C. 27 medical staff are supporting the Canadian Paralympic team. The Canadian Paralympic team in London is getting a big boost from Canada’s western-most province, with British Columbia-born or-trained athletes making up 29 per cent of the team. 29 per cent of the athletes representing Canada were either born in, or train in, British Columbia. Of those, 15 per cent are from B.C. 19 athlete support personnel play key roles with the Canadian Paralympic team during the event competitions. Of the 42 athletes B.C. is sending, 38 were born and raised here, while the other four have received substantial training support through the B.C. sport system. B.C. Paralympians in London will be competing in 18 different sports.British Columbia is also sending a strong contingent of coaches, technical staff, medical and administrative team members, as well as athlete support personnel who call British Columbia home.Kelowna wheelchair rugby athlete Garett Hickling will magnify British Columbia’s presence at the Opening Ceremony. In addition to his role as a competitor, Hickling has the honour of leading the Canadian Paralympic team as flag-bearer.The 2012 London Paralympics begin Wednesday and concludes Sunday, September 9.Quick Facts: 147 athletes make up the Canadian Paralympic team. 45 coaches and technical staff lead the Canadian Paralympic team in London. Of those, 21 per cent are from B.C.last_img read more

August 3, 2020 | |Post a Comment

first_imgBentley plays in the five-team Chinook Hockey League, against teams from Fort Saskatchewan, Okotoks, Innisfail and Stony Plain.The Generals dominated the league, finishing in top spot with a 23-1 record.However, Macleod said the playoff run was anything but easy as Bentley won the league championship by defeating Innisfail in the final.“At the beginning of the year I was a little unsure I was making the right decision to play for the Generals but as the year went on, playing with the guys, in realized I missed hockey,” MacLeod, finishing the season with a goal and six assists in 13 games, said.The sour taste MacLeod experienced at the beginning of the season came from time toiling in the ECHL and SPHL.“I really didn’t like the business side of hockey,” said MacLeod, who played for South Carolina Stingrays, Columbus Cottonmouths and Stockton Thunder.MacLeod graduated from Nelson Minor Hockey before playing for Beaver Valley Nitehawks of the KIJHL.He joined Penticton of the BCHL before being traded to Camrose Kodiaks during his final season of junior hockey.MacLeod then spent four years on a NCAA hockey scholarship at Michigan Tech where he earned a degree in mechanical engineering.“I realized after a few seasons (of professional hockey) I wasn’t going to make NHL. I was happy to have an education and decided to go and start the next chapter of my life.”The Generals are 2-0 at the Allan Cup tournament with round robin wins over host Clarenville Caribous 3-2 and a 4-1 victory over Lameque Au Ptit Mousse from New Brunswick.Bentley now faces GF Windsor in semi final round action Friday with a win advaning the Alberta squad into the Final Saturday.MacLeod said the teams at the Allan Cup tournament are very evenly matched.“We could have just as been 0-2 as 2-0,” he said.“But we have a very deep teams and a great group of guys who are really fun play on the same team with.”A team with a Nelsonite playing that will hopefully give Nelson that historical Allan Cup victory. A hockey player from Nelson is trying to accomplish what no Nelson team has ever done before — win the Allan Cup, emblematic of Canadian Men’s Senior AAA Hockey supremacy.Nelson Minor Hockey grad Alex MacLeod is currently in Clarenville, Newfoundland playing in the six-team 2015 Allan Cup Tournament for the Bentley Generals.“I was pretty young when Nelson played for the Allan Cup,” MacLeod said from Clarenville where the Generals were enjoying a much-needed day off in preparation for a spot in Friday’s semi finals.“I remember hearing about Nelson playing in the 1965 and in the 80’s but that about it.”The Allan Cup is the oldest national championship in the country dating back 106 years as the best Senior hockey teams in Canada battled it out for the coveted prize.Nelson Maple Leafs were part of the Western International Hockey League, playing in three Allan Cup Finals in 1965, 1986 and 1987.The WIHL folded in the late 1980s.Playing in the 2015 Allan Cup tournament was probably the last thing on MacLeod’s mind when the season started for the Generals in the fall.Deciding to retire from professional hockey after a few seasons in the East Coast Hockey League and Southern Professional Hockey League, MacLeod was working as a mechanical engineer in Fort McMurray, Alta., when a friend told him about the Generals Hockey Club.“I asked him to gently tell the coach I was interested in still playing,” MacLeod explained.The rest, they say, is history as Macleod’s name was given to a company in Calgary that had an opening for — you guessed it — a recent mechanical engineer graduate.“It all happened within a few weeks,” MacLeod said.last_img read more

August 2, 2020 | |Post a Comment

first_img            VICTOR ESPINOZA, STELLAR WIND, WINNER: “Whether the pace was going to be slow or fast…everything changed out of the gate and I was ready for it. I bounced out of there and I was going to figure it out when we hit the first turn. I wanted to see how fast we were going. They slowed it down pretty good, so I kept her closer. That was the best thing because with that pace I couldn’t leave her too much to do.“I have to give Mike (Smith, aboard Tara’s Tango) a lot of credit because Tara’s Tango was really fighting and he was riding her so hard. But Stellar Wind got the job done and she felt great. I know it’s a little bit hot but she seemed to come back really well after the wire.”MIKE SMITH, TARA’S TANGO, SECOND: “I’ve been waiting for this, to run long. In saying that though, I didn’t want to have to make such a long run. But, it was a good tactical move on Victor’s part because I don’t think he wins if he didn’t move on me that early.“He had a horse that was more seasoned, who’s been around two turns several times and it was Tara’s Tango’s first time around two turns. All that happened was that she got a little tired at the end. If that doesn’t happen, I think I get it.” JOCKEY QUOTES JOHN SADLER, STELLAR WIND, WINNER: “She ran very well and had to give away the weight, she gave away five pounds today. With the pace slow she had a long, extended, wide run. The second filly, Tara’s Tango is a very nice filly. It felt like a Stonestreet exacta with Curlin (Stellar Wind’s sire) being so close to Stonestreet’s Mrs. Banke and the late Jess Jackson who also owned the horse that finished second.“I don’t really have anything planned yet. I’ll take her down to Del Mar and then we’ll decide if we want to take her out of town or if we want to run her on the grass. We have two choices with her down there. We’ll see how it goes.” NOTES: Winning owners Kosta and Peter Hronis are from Delano, CA. TRAINER QUOTES KOSTA HRONIS, STELLAR WIND, WINNER: “I think we’d like to keep her on dirt for now. If we stay home here at Del Mar, we’d probably have to switch her over to the grass. If we keep her on dirt, we might go to Saratoga.” -30-last_img read more

August 2, 2020 | |Post a Comment

first_imgARCADIA, Calif. (March 17, 2016)–Graded stakes winning Toews On Ice heads a field of seven sophomores in Santa Anita’s $75,000 San Pedro Stakes at six furlongs on Sunday. (Originally scheduled for this past Friday, March 11, the San Pedro was cancelled due to heavy rain and re-drawn this morning).TOEWS ON ICE: Trained by Bob Baffert and named for Chicago Blackhawks star center and captain, Jonathan Toews (pronounced TAVES), Toews On Ice was an impressive winner of the Grade III, seven furlong Bob Hope Stakes three starts back on Nov. 14 at Del Mar, but he comes off a disappointing sixth place finish as the 3-5 favorite in the one mile Smarty Jones Stakes at Oaklawn Park Jan. 18.Owned by Mike Pegram, Karl Watson and Paul Weitman, Toews On Ice, who is Triple Crown nominated, was a close second to his highly regarded stablemate Mor Spirit two starts back in the Grade I Los Alamitos Futurity on Dec. 19. A Kentucky-bred colt by Archarcharch, Toews On Ice has pressed or been on the early lead in all seven of his starts, resulting in three wins and earnings of $245,700.DENMAN’S CALL: Trained by Doug O’Neill, this Kentucky-bred gelding by Northern Afleet has done little wrong in two starts. A stylish 3 ¾ length first-out maiden special weight winner going 5 ½ furlongs here on Jan. 9, Denman’s Call hugged the rail en route to an impressive third place finish behind top Derby contender Nyquist in the Grade II, seven furlong San Vicente Stakes on Feb. 15–an effort that earned him a lofty 94 Beyer Speed figure. Owned by Gilman Racing, Westside Rentals.com or W.C. Racing, Inc., Denman’s Call is also Triple Crown nominated and could use a win in the San Pedro as a springboard to the Derby trail.THE SAN PEDRO STAKES FIELD IN POST POSITION ORDER WITH JOCKEYS & WEIGHTSRACE 8  Approximate post time, 4:05 p.m. PTMt Veeder – Rafael Bejarano – 120He’s a Tiger – Edwin Maldonado – 120Iron Rob – Stewart Elliot – 120Boldly True – Drayden Van Dyke – 120Denman’s Call – Flavien Prat – 120Toews On Ice – Victor Espinoza – 124Gold Rush Dancer – Gary Stevens – 120last_img read more