Tag: 唔准唔开心论坛

December 27, 2019 | | Post a Comment

first_imgDONEGAL will play Mayo in the All-Ireland final as the men from the West saw off a startling Dublin comeback to win an incredible match at Croke Park.The Mayo men finally saw off the All-Ireland champions by 0-19 to 0-16 in today’s semi-final. The referee played an extra seven minutes of the match; two more than had been called as the Dubs went for goal.It was a pulsating game – and a sometimes violent match – as repeated Dublin fouls on Mayo players left one of them in hospital and another with blood pouring from a head wound.Mayo had gone in at half-time leading 0-12 to 0-06.And they stormed ahead in the second half, leading at one stage by ten points. But Dublin staged one of the great comebacks in front of 81,364 at Croke Park reducing the deficit to just three points.And then Bernard Brogan went for goal, only to see his shot saved brilliantly saved by Clarke.Within a minute O’Connor missed a sitter for Mayo – putting a goal chance wide.The Connacht champions held on to set up a first ever All-Ireland final clash with Donegal.TV pundit and 1993 All-Ireland winner Joe Brolly said the Mayo win was “a victory for Donegal” saying the Ulster Champions will fancy their chances in a final against Mayo rather than Dublin.Brolly – who will be at O’Donnell Park on September 14th – also poked fun at Pat Spillane after the game. The Kerry legend said that teams like Donegal and Mayo had been too nice in the past.“The Donegal fans weren’t too nice to you last week Spillane – and quite right too after what you said,” said the Derryman.DONEGAL TO PLAY MAYO IN FINAL AFTER DUBS BEATEN AT CROKER was last modified: September 2nd, 2012 by BrendaShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:DONEGAL TO PLAY MAYO IN FINAL AFTER DUBS BEATEN AT CROKERlast_img read more

December 25, 2019 | | Post a Comment

first_imgBudget 2013 cuts for Co. Donegal Further Education sector are unjust and unfair, the Chairperson Co. Donegal Teachers’ Union of Ireland has said.Joanne Irwin said says cuts here are an attack on “some of the most marginalised and vulnerable learners in the county.”She told Donegal Daily today: “It is a backward step in terms of equality, tackling disadvantage and attempting to provide a level playing field in education. “The further education sector provides a high quality alternative to mainstream higher education for students whose aptitudes and interests lie in areas as diverse as animation, music, horticultural and jewellery design.”She said the increase in the pupil/teacher ratio announced in the Budget will result in the loss of 200 full time teaching posts nationally.“In reality 500 teachers will lose their job as many teachers are now part time. This is a huge reduction in frontline staffing levels,” said Ms Irwin.The union leader said cuts would hit Further Education students worst including: • Second chance / adult learners– Those who left education during the Celtic Tiger with no formal skills or qualifications– Those who are qualified in areas where there are no longer employment opportunities who need to up-skill and retrain– Stay at home parents whose families have grown up and who wish to train / up-skill in order to re-enter the labour market• Unemployed citizens who wish retrain/upskill to re-enter the labour market or start their own business. • Students who were not ideally suited to mainstream education, because, in many cases, it did not address their particular interests and aptitudes.• Some students/school leavers choose PLC schools to undertake particular high quality, specialist courses – performing arts, green energy, art and design, cloud computing etc.“Some of these students come with particular educational challenges and therefore need particular and focused support,” said Ms Irwin.“This is why smaller class sizes are vital in the sector. In addition, many of the courses have a focus on practical work and small classes are essential for these courses.” She added: “Now is not the time to cut a sector specially equipped to retrain and upskill our unemployed citizens. The budget measure is counter-productive. It will lead to further educational inequality and societal division.”CUTS IN DONEGAL EDUCATION ATTACK ON SOCIETY’S WEAKEST, SAYS LOCAL TEACHERS’ UNION CHAIR was last modified: January 2nd, 2013 by BrendaShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:CUTS IN DONEGAL EDUCATION ATTACK ON SOCIETY’S WEAKESTdonegaleducation cutsSAYS LOCAL TEACHERS’ UNION CHAIRlast_img read more

December 21, 2019 | | Post a Comment

first_imgAnita Guidera has lived and worked in County Donegal for 30 years, first with the Donegal People’s Press and later as the North West correspondent for the Irish Independent. In recent years she has worked as a freelance journalist and features writer for the Irish Independent and other media outlets. She is currently working on a number of Donegal-based multimedia projects. This is Anita’s My Donegal.Where is your favourite place in Donegal and why?I am fortunate that my work has taken me to virtually every nook and cranny in the county but even after 30 years, I am still discovering new and beautiful places. So, from one of our more recent adventures, my current favourite spot is the spectacular coastal route between Maghery and Marameelan in the Rosses. Although not great for driving, this is an ideal route for hiking or cycling, steeped in history with magnificent coastal and mountain views. Where in Donegal do you call home?Ramelton! Aside from a brief sojourn in Letterkenny and Churchill, Ramelton has been home to me for the past 30 years. Call me biased but I think you’d be hard-pressed to find anywhere in Ireland which has gifted the world with more internationally influential people across all fields from politics and sport to religion, medicine, the arts and most recently a Nobel Prize winner. I love the warmth and welcoming nature of the people, the irrepressible pride of place and unbeatable community spirit.Who is the one person in Donegal that you look up to and why?I’m going a little off-script here and probably as a result of years spent working in courts, but my heroes (and yes, it’s plural) are Donegal’s unsung ones, those hugely courageous survivors of abuse who have had the courage to stand up to their abusers, often at great personal cost, and face them in court. What do you think is Donegal’s best tourist attraction?There are the obvious ones for good reason, like Sliabh Liag and Glenveagh National Park, but Donegal’s real trump card is its hundreds of kilometres of spectacular coastline, punctuated with idyllic beaches and coves and its untamed mountainous landscape.Do you prefer Donegal summers or Donegal winters?Both have their different appeal but at heart I’m more of a summer person.What would you do on your ideal day out in Donegal? There’s nothing I enjoy more than taking guests to parts of Donegal they have never been and experiencing the wonder of these places anew through their eyes. Typically this would entail taking the most scenic routes to get to the chosen destination. I always plan a round trip that takes in mountains, beach, coffee and lunch stops and that preferably ends with sunset a pint! Left to our own devices, it doesn’t get better than getting in the camper with my husband Don and heading off to uncover yet more of Donegal’s endless secrets, all the better if it involves kayak and bicycle as well!What is your favourite Donegal-made product?Nothing says Donegal quite like Donegal Tweed. I love how much a part of the history of the place it is and how its colours and textures mirror the landscape.Who is Donegal’s greatest ambassador around the world and why? Those who bring Donegal’s music and traditional crafts to an international audience are the best kind of ambassadors.Who is Donegal’s most successful businessperson in your opinion?It depends on how you measure success! I admire anyone who chooses Donegal as a location for their business, however large or small, despite its challenges, because of the unique quality of life it will afford them and their family. They deserve our support.Who is your favourite Donegal sportsperson of all time?I’m in awe that the legendary Dave Gallaher (1873-1917) who captained the All Black originals rugby team on their celebrated 1905-1906 tour of Britain, France and North America, was born a few doors up from where we live on Castle Street in Ramelton.What is your favourite Donegal restaurant?This is a tough one because there are so many exciting things happening on the Donegal food front right now. I love Coffee Time in Kilmacrennan because of their absolute commitment to making everything from scratch (baking bread, churning butter, curing meats..) and how they are breathing new life into old and lost Donegal dishes.If you could change one thing about Donegal what would it be?I would quite like if it rained less.What is your favourite Donegal saying or expression?No bother at all (and nothing is!)What is the biggest challenge facing the people of Donegal today?Resisting development that would be injurious to Donegal’s most valuable asset of all, its pristine land and seascape.What is your favourite Donegal food?Don’t make me choose one! Vegetables from Ballyholey farm, Calamari at the Seafood Shack, Killybegs, Fish tacos at Fisk, Downings, Scarpellos sour dough bread, turf smoked salmon from the Haven Smokehouse, the cheese burger at Coffee Time, Kilmacrennan, pizza at the Taproom, Rathmullan, chowder at Nancy’s Barn, Ballyliffin, mussels at The Bridge Bar Seafood Restaurant, Ramelton……Is there anything that really annoys you about Donegal or its people?The lack of mobile broadband connectivity.Do you have a favourite local band?Donegal is bursting with musical talent across all genres but I find myself drawn more and more to traditional music and how deeply connected it is to place and people. It’s hard to beat a traditional session at Hiudaí’s in Bunbeg, led by the inimitable Hiudaí, and including Howard Chu on fiddle!If you had a million euro to improve something in Donegal what would it be?Better mobile broadband connectivity would make it an even more attractive place to work and live.Daniel O’Donnell or Packie Bonner?Noel Cunningham!Is there anything about Donegal that you are very proud of?I’m proud of how welcoming and kind the people are.My Donegal – with journalist and writer Anita Guidera was last modified: August 4th, 2019 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:Anita GuideraMY DONEGALRameltonWriterlast_img read more

December 19, 2019 | | Post a Comment

first_imgJustice MalalaWriting in the New York Times in late July this year, Howard W French told a truth often ignored.“As a matter of convention,” he wrote, “we constantly say and write things about Africa that would be unimaginable with any other continent.“An often thoughtless broad-brush treatment belies the fact of diversity on a continent of 53 countries (even this is not a settled number) and close to a billion inhabitants, a place of light and dark, rich and poor, increasingly well-governed and still appallingly ill­governed people.”These words came back to me a few days after they were published while I listened to the speeches at the Sunday Times Book Awards on 1 August. As the finalists and winners were announced to a room packed with government ministers, academics, authors, publishers, intellectuals and journalists, it occurred to me that perhaps here, in South Africa, we are beginning to show that indeed we are like the rest of the world.We are, in French’s words, “light and dark, rich and poor”. In so many of the works that nearly made it, and the two fiction and non-fiction titles that finally won, this world of light and dark is explored and expanded upon. It is more than light and dark: it is a multicoloured thing, complex and worthy of investigation.In politics, Africa conjures up certain images. People speak of the “dark continent” and easily draw the line towards the Ugandan dictator Idi Amin or the former Zaire’s Mobutu Sese Seko.And yet I know I have lived for five years under the most benign, democratic presidential term many anywhere in the world can ever have known. I lived from 1994 to 1999 under President Nelson Mandela. That image, that five years, and the 10 after it under Thabo Mbeki, is not the “dark continent”. It is another country. It is the shining light to the dark.I write two weekly columns for two different publications. Never once have I felt that I cannot write what I like; criticise as I like, offend as I feel. I live in a free country.As I write this the new president of our republic, Jacob Zuma, has just visited a township where over the past few weeks there have been service delivery riots. The people of Balfour complained about poor provision of water, electricity and corruption.Zuma arrived unannounced, walked and talked with the people of the township and then went to the mayor’s office. A worker tucking into her lunch was so shocked to see him there her plate fell out of her hands and smashed to the floor.The mayor was not around. Zuma told his officials he would sit in the mayor’s office until the man came to the office. Many have asked why the mayor was not at his desk. He could have been out seeing residents – like Zuma. In the dark light, in the broad brush, many rushed to say he was lazy and was caught out by the president.The man had been booked off sick. He roused himself out of bed and came to see Zuma. Sometimes, you see, things are grey. Not dark, not light. This is what Africa needs: the chance to be all shades, not just the “dark continent”.Over the past few years the eyes of the international community have increasingly been turning towards South Africa. With the 2009 Fifa Confederations Cup in June, the Lions Tour and the Indian Premier League, billions of people across the world were glued to their television screens watching the various sports events unfold.At the end of each of these sports fests, not many would say that South Africa had not pulled off the organisation spectacularly well. I remember speaking to Hans Klaus, head of communications for Fifa, who told me that if anyone ever thought the 2010 World Cup could not be staged in South Africa then they had their answer: the Confederations Cup was an outstanding success.On the economic front, many across the world expected the Zuma administration to follow a leftist economic slant due to the ruling African National Congress’s closeness to its trade union allies. Talk of nationalization of mines was rife. Yet Zuma has dismissed this talk.The respected ratings agency Moody in July showed its faith in the new government’s economic policy probity by upgrading its foreign currency rating. Finance Minister Pravin Gordhan welcomed the move, saying: “We welcome their understanding that President Zuma’s government … is committed to maintaining a very sound approach to fiscal policy, but at the same time ensuring that we remain agile and responsive to the many challenges that countries like South Africa face.”Dark continent? Hardly.So what favours can we be done as we hurtle inexorably to the 2010 World Cup? How can the world help us? No favours, really, except for the world’s eyes to be opened, for our “light and dark” to be seen in full splendour and not rolled into one “dark continent”. The world merely needs to start seeing Africa, and South Africa, as a place of many shades, of many contradictions, of many triumphs and many failures. Like Europe, like any other place on earth.It is the least the world can do for us. It is all we ask for. The rest, the proof (if any is needed) that we are special, is up to us.Justice Malala is an award-winning former newspaper editor, and is now general manager of Avusa’s stable of 56 magazines. He writes weekly columns for The Times newspaper and Financial Mail magazine, as well as a monthly media and politics column for Empire magazine. He is the resident political analyst for independent television channel e.tv and has consulted extensively for financial institutions on South African political risk. Malala was also an executive producer on Hard Copy I and II, a ground-breaking television series on SABC 3. Hard Copy I won the Golden Horn Award for best television series. Malala’s work has been published internationally in the Wall Street Journal, The Guardian, Financial Times, The Independent, Forbes, Institutional Investor, The Age and The Observer.last_img read more

December 16, 2019 | | Post a Comment

first_imgcurt hopkins Tags:#Breaking#business#news#web “The Internet is a fad. We’re one of the few companies who have realized that hard truth. Plus, 99.2% of the content is pictures of ladies in tube tops but you can’t read it on the can! Look, we’re marshaling the shift of RWW from a doomed online fad-publication to a perfect-bound, four-color slick. What’s it gonna be? Sick!” ReadWriteWeb was founded in 1972 in a New Zealand sheep camp by MacManus, a Nell-like savant who lived in a pile of oily rags and made a bare living from recycling old bed frames. As it grew, ReadWriteWeb became well-known among trade-paper sub-editors, interior decorators, wolves, millionaire patrons of art, sadists, nymphomaniacs, bridge sharks, anarchists, women living on alimony, tire formers, educational cranks, economists, hopheads, dipsomaniac playwrights, nudists, restaurant keepers, stockbrokers and dentists as “the smart alternative to Cheri.”OZJ made its bones by pioneering the development and sales of mesquite-flavored Japanese-style toilet bacon In 25-, 50- and 150-foot family spools. After expanding its comestibles line, it moved into toys, personal defense technology, comfort tools, hardware, folk medicines and teachin’s. Them teachin’s will definitely guide the expansion of OZJ into publishing. How will the focus of RWW change under the influence of the new investors? We asked MacManus. “I’m buying a freaking cigarette boat with an airbrush painting of Janet Frame on the side and an Ed Brown Classic Custom Centennial with hand-relief engraving on the slide flats, grip screws, thumb safety flats, laser engraving on the the slide, ‘Tru-Ivory’ grips and a jeweled barrel hood!” Ozark Jimmy’s Global Enterprises Holding Company is a privately held firm, whose backers include Taq Hamas Revolutionary Venture Funding Cell, Cahuenga Brothers, Ltd. and the Virtual Hillbilly Investment Capital Fund. Billy-Joe Al ‘Abdurrahman, general partner of Taq Hammas and Nimrod Cajones, general partner of Cahuenga Brothers, Ltd., joined Ozark Jimmy’s Global Enterprises Holding Company’s Board of Directors in 2001. Abdurrahman is currently director of numerous companies, none of which can be mentioned by name on pain of death. Cajones was a co-founder of Poncho.com, and is a director of several high-growth Internet companies, including Llamaspace, Cahuengista.com and Martha Stewart Living. Cigarette boat photograph by Brent Ozar Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market ReadWriteWeb‘s founder, Richard “Chuy” MacManus, announced this morning that the publication has accepted its first major investment. The infusion of cash, to the tune of $14 million, came from OZJ Investments, a subsidiary of Ozark Jimmy’s Global Enterprises Holding Company. OZJ CTO and Spokesman, Carlos Canulas, explained some of the changes ahead for the publications. Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting Related Posts A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai…last_img read more

November 27, 2019 | | Post a Comment

first_imgNetherlands’ Arjen Robben goes down to win a penalty during their round of 16 tie against Mexico Arjen Robben did little to defuse the debate about his reputation for diving.The Netherlands winger earned an injury-time penalty Sunday and then watched as teammate Klaas Jan Huntelaar converted from the spot to give the Dutch a come-from-behind 2-1 victory over Mexico in the second round of the World Cup.Robben collapsed theatrically under a challenge from Rafael Marquez, causing emotional Mexico coach Miguel Herrera to blame his team’s loss on referee Pedro Proenca.”We ended up losing because he whistled a penalty that did not exist,” he said, adding that Robben “dived three times. The referee should have cautioned him.”Throughout his career, Robben has had a reputation for frequently falling and looking for a penalty or free kick.But the 30-year-old Bayern Munich star appears to have matured. In recent seasons, it has been his scintillating form rather than theatrical falls that have grabbed headlines.He set up a goal and scored the winner in Bayern Munich’s 2013 Champions League final win and has been in the form of his life in Brazil, scoring three times and providing an inch-perfect assist for a Memphis Depay goal in the three Dutch victories in Group B.In Fortaleza’s Arena Castelao he appeared to be unlucky not to have won a penalty shortly before half time, when Mexico defenders Marquez and Hector Moreno raced back to tackle him after he linked up with Robin van Persie in a fast break.advertisement”If that wasn’t a penalty, I don’t know what is,” Robben said.But he conceded that he had taken one dive earlier in the first half that the referee waved off.”I have to say, in the first half – and right away offer my excuses – I dived. I mustn’t do that. It was another stupid action,” he told Dutch broadcaster NOS.Mexico captain Marquez told reporters that Robben conceded he had dived in injury time too – though Robben did not say that on Dutch TV.”I spoke with him (Robben) after the match and he told me that it was not a penalty,” Marquez said. “He said that the first foul was a penalty and that one was not called.”Whatever the debate, one thing is clear – the Netherlands is through to the quarterfinals thanks to the penalty Robben won.last_img read more

November 16, 2019 | | Post a Comment

first_img4th Test, Day 4, brief scores: India 622 for 7 declared (Pujara 193, Pant 159 not out, Jadeja 81, Lyon 4 for 178) vs Australia (300 all out; Harris 79, Kuldeep 5 for 99) & 6/0 (Harris 2*, Khawaja 4*) at stumps, trail by 316 runs following on. Full ScorecardAustralia hit a new low in Test cricket on Sunday as they were asked to follow-on by Virat Kohli in the ongoing fourth Test on Sunday after the hosts got bowled out for 300 in their first innings to trail India by 322 runs at stumps in Sydney. India’s first innings lead is the fourth highest for the team outside Asia in Test cricket.Looking at India’s huge first-innings lead, Kohli had no hesitation in asking Australia to bat again and thus, became only the second Indian captain after Kapil Dev to enforce the follow-on at the Sydney Cricket Ground.Kapil had taken the same decision in the Sydney Test back in 1986 and coincidentally, he had done it on the same date – January 6.It was the last day of the New Year Test in 1986 when Kapil asked Australia to bat again after India had declared on 600 for 4 in the first innings and then bowled out the hosts for 396 on the final day before asking them to follow-on. The match ended in a draw as Australia finished the day at 119 for 6.33 years later Kohli has repeated history but this time India has the chance to go on and win the match with a session and another day’s play left to be played. The Sydney weather might be the only factor which can come to Australia’s rescue.advertisementEngland were the last team to force Australia to follow-on at home in the drawn 1988 Sydney Test, a result the hosts are unlikely to repeat unless the weather intervenes. To put things in perspective, none of the players in the current Indian playing XI were even born back then.In fact, England was the last team to ask Australia to follow-on outside Australia, in the fourth Test of the Ashes series in 2005.With a first series win in Australia all but confirmed, India got the four remaining Australia wickets in 21 overs with Kuldeep Yadav completing his five-wicket haul after rain had delayed play for four hours on Sunday.Kuldeep Yadav’s first Test on Aussie soil and he collects a five-wicket haul!#AUSvIND | @Domaincomau pic.twitter.com/e29NWD6oyZcricket.com.au (@cricketcomau) January 6, 2019Kohli then chose to enforce the follow-on as his team chases the prize of its first victory at the SCG since 1978.After the rain delay it took India just six balls to strike with Mohammed Shami (2-58) bowling Pat Cummins for 25 with a ball that kept low.Peter Handscomb added nine runs to his overnight score before he was bowled for 37 to become Jasprit’s Bumrah’s first wicket of the match and reduce Australia to 257-8.Tea has been called due to bad light. The third session is scheduled to commence at 16:03 if the light situation improves #TeamIndia #AUSvsIND pic.twitter.com/E4c3SA7dVeBCCI (@BCCI) January 6, 2019Kuldeep (5-99) then trapped Nathan Lyon for no score.Mitchell Starc and Josh Hazlewood shared an entertaining 42-run partnership for the last wicket to take Australia past 300 for just the second time this series, before Kuldeep got his fifth by having Hazlewood (21) out lbw in the 105th over. Starc finished on 29 not out.India denied Australia any real possibility of a victory here in Sydney by posting 622 for 7 in the first innings with Cheteshwar Pujara (193) and Rishabh Pant (159 not out) scoring hundreds.Also Read | Kuldeep Yadav 1st Chinaman bowler to bag 5-wicket haul in Tests in Australia in 64 yearsAlso Read | Virat Kohli will be India’s best-ever captain if he keeps learning: Sunil GavaskarAlso Read | Rishabh Pant needs to bat at No. 6, he can convert starts into hundreds: Sunil Gavaskarlast_img read more

October 14, 2019 | | Post a Comment

first_imgAPTN National NewsJoe McLeod is an elderly Winnipeg First Nations man who was jailed last year after Winnipeg police charged him with assault.McLeod had pushed his wife, but didn’t realize it because he suffers from Alzheimer’s disease.After spending nearly a month behind bars, and amid public outcry, McLeod was released from jail and placed in a personal care home.On Monday, McLeod was charged with aggravated assault for allegedly pushing a fellow resident at the care home.The man was taken to hospital in critical condition and died Tuesday.It remains unclear whether McLeod will face an upgraded charge.last_img read more