May 18, 2021 | |Post a Comment

first_imgABC News(NEW YORK) — It was another hot day across much of the U.S. on Friday, including the parts of the Northeast, where the region’s first official heat wave of 2019 was recorded.Philadelphia and New York’s LaGuardia Airport both reached 93 degrees on Friday, while Newark, New Jersey, reached 90. It was the third day in a row of 90 degrees or higher in these locations, making it an official heat wave.Meanwhile, in the Plains, temperatures were up into the upper 90s from Texas to Nebraska, including 100 degrees in Concordia, Kansas. Chicago recorded its first 90-degree day in 2019, while, at Chicago Midway International Airport, it was day three of 90-degree heat.The heat still has a grip on a large part of the nation from the southwest to the central U.S. and into the Northeast. The heat index will exceed 100 degrees from Kansas to Minnesota, where heat advisories have been issued with heat and humidity approaching dangerous levels. New excessive heat alerts are being issued for Minneapolis, as the heat index could approach 105 degrees on Sunday.The heat index will rise into the 90s across from the Carolinas and into parts of southern New York. The heat index should reach 94 or 95 degrees in Philadelphia and New York City on Saturday.In the Northeast, a storm system is approaching from the west. The trailing cold front will begin to interact with the hot and steamy air that is settled along the Interstate 95 corridor. As a result, the atmosphere will be primed for severe storm activity Saturday afternoon from Washington, D.C., to Boston, including Philadelphia and New York City.After temperatures reach the 90s early Saturday afternoon, storms will begin mid-afternoon and last into the early evening hours. It is likely that severe thunderstorms — capable of damaging winds, hail and lightning — will cover the I-95 cities later Saturday. Due to the higher levels of humidity, storms have the potential to quickly drop a lot of rain, and create localized flash flooding.Additionally, many people are seeking relief from the heat at the shore, and therefore they will need to be extra vigilant as storms develop Saturday afternoon.Behind the cold front, temperatures will drop significantly — in some cases, nearly 20 degrees. Humidity will also decrease.However, a peek ahead shows that the heat wants to return to the eastern U.S. very quickly with all indications that temperatures will be near, or into, the 90s for parts of the Northeast by the middle of the week. Additionally, there are strong signals for significant heat across the southeast U.S. heading into the Fourth of July holiday.It is becoming more likely that parts of the northeast U.S. will see a hot, steamy, sunny and stormy holiday weekend.Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

May 18, 2021 | |Post a Comment

first_imgBrian Sevald/iStock(ST. LOUIS) — For the second time since classes resumed at public schools in St. Louis this month, grief counselors will be on hand at an elementary school on Monday to comfort friends of 8-year-old Jurnee Thompson, a third-grader gunned down while standing in front of a restaurant with relatives following a football game.Since April, nine children under the age of 17 have been killed by gun violence in the city of St. Louis, and authorities say no one has been charged in any of the slayings.“We are all at risk,” a frustrated St. Louis Mayor Lyda Krewson said at a news conference on Saturday. “If you are as outraged as I am … please help.”Saying the child killings have reached a point of “urgency,” Krewson announced a $25,000 CrimeStoppers reward for information leading to an arrest in any of the unsolved cases.“The message now for these shooters is when you engage in this type of violent behavior, there will be a significant incentive for people to give us information to lead to your arrest,” Krewson said.But Lisa Pisciotta, executive director of St. Louis Regional CrimeStoppers, said the reward money will only be available until Sept. 1, and encouraged people with information on any of the case to contact police immediately, adding that all tips will be kept anonymous.“It expresses the urgency of the situation,” Krewson said of the time limit put on the reward.Less than 24 hours after Krewson announced the reward, St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department homicide investigators responded to the fatal shooting of a 15-year-old boy. The victim, whose name was not immediately released, was discovered on the southeast side of the city at 6 a.m. on Sunday with a bullet wound to the head.Police said no arrests have been made.The fatal shooting came about 35 hours after Jurnee Thompson was shot in the head and killed on the northeast side of the city after she attended the football jamboree, the city’s annual kickoff to the high school football season, police said.St. Louis Police Chief John Hayden said Jurnee had attended the jamboree at Soldan High School and was waiting for a food order with her two teenage cousins outside a restaurant when gunfire rang out.St. Louis Schools Superintendent Kelvin Adams said counselors will be at Herzog Elementary school on Monday to provide support for classmates and teacher who knew the girl.“I don’t know that there are words to explain how difficult it is for the families that are hurting, and the impact this has on the community,” Adams told reporters on Saturday.The girl’s death came just 12 days after 7-year-old Xavier Usanga was killed by a stray bullet while playing near his St. Louis home. Xavier was slain a day before he was to start the second grade at Clay Elementary School in St. Louis.A funeral for Xavier was held on Saturday.“I miss your smile, your laugh, your hair. I couldn’t believe that you were gone. Why would someone take your life away?” Xavier’s 10-year-old sister, Trinity Usanga, told mourners who packed her brother’s funeral at a St. Louis Catholic church, according to the St. Louis Post-Dispatch newspaper.Federal authorities said in court earlier this month that a 23-year-old man, who was arrested and charged with stealing $50,000 from an armored car company he worked for, had confessed to firing the shots that killed Xavier. St. Louis police continue to investigate the killing, but state prosecutors have yet to charge him in the homicide.On Saturday, Chief Hayden read off a list of other fatal shootings of children that have yet to be solved and pleaded with the public to come forward with information.He said it was time for people in the community to be less concerned about retaliation for coming forward with information to police and more concerned about “what would happen to little children if you don’t.”Hayden said other unsolved homicides of children include the April 30 killing of 2-year-old Kayden Johnson and his 18-year-old mother, Trina’ty Riley, who were shot to death while hiding in a closet of their home after an intruder broke in.He said Kennedi Powell, 3, was shot to death on June 9 when she was standing on a sidewalk near her father’s car with other children and a gunman drove up in a vehicle and opened fire.Four other children and three adults were injured in the incident. No arrests have been made.Eddie Hill IV, 10, was killed in another drive-by shooting on July 19 as he stood on the front porch of his home with his father, Hayden said. No arrests have been made.Other youngsters killed by gun violence were Kristina Curry, 16, who was found shot to death in the parking lot of a high school on May 23; Derrel Williams, 15, who died on June 25 after being discovered shot on a street; and Jashon Johnson, 16, was found shot multiple times on a street on June 8.“In each of these cases, police investigators know that people were at or near the scene of these homicides. Please help us find the shooters,” Jimmie Edwards, the St. Louis public safety director and a former juvenile court judge, said at Saturday’s news conference. “If you or someone else you know may be hiding a shooter, please turn them in. Your failure to turn in people that have committed these types of offenses may also cause you to be charged with a crime.”Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. 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May 18, 2021 | |Post a Comment

first_imgPacific Marine Mammal Center(LOS ANGELES) — A California sea lion found on a beach with pellet gunshot wounds was euthanized as officials search for who was responsible, officials announced on Tuesday.Employees at the Pacific Marine Mammal Center rescued the female sea lion after it was found in distress on Newport Beach on Dec. 16 after being reported by animal control, the center said in a press release.The 1 1/2 year-old sea lion, named Mandalorian by rescuers, was found to have two gunshots in the chest, most likely from a pellet rifle, the press release stated.Mandalorian was monitored for a week and received treatment, but its health continued to decline. It was “humanely euthanized” on Dec. 22, the center said.A necropsy done on Mandalorian showed one of the bullets was “between the rib and adjacent vertebrae” and the wound “most likely became infected, leading to severe muscle necrosis around the impact site and an accumulation of fluid in the chest cavity,” officials said.The second pellet was lodged in the mammal’s muscles between its ribs.The pellets were recovered and sent to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s National Marine Fisheries Service Office of Law Enforcement for additional investigation.“Unfortunately, what we saw is taking place up and down the Pacific Coast. These are disgusting and intentional acts, many of which are pre-meditated. We know there are many out there that feel like they are competing with the sea lions for the same resources,” said Peter Chang, CEO of the center. “However, there’s a pathway for us to cohabitate with these precious marine mammals, and shooting them is not the way.”  Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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first_imgGrand Junction Police Department (GRAND JUNCTION, Colo.) — An Uber passenger was arrested after pulling a gun on a driver in an attempt to kidnap her, police said. The suspect, 23-year-old Adam Salaz, was picked up in Carlsbad, New Mexico, Sunday on charges related to the incident that occurred in Grand Junction, Colorado. The Uber driver had picked up a male passenger on Friday, Jan. 10, police said. As she was driving, the passenger pulled a gun on her, demanding she drive him to the desert, according to a statement posted on the Grand Junction Police Department’s website.The driver jumped from the vehicle while it was still in motion and escaped. The suspect drove off in the vehicle — a white 2019 Toyota C-HR. The victim suffered minor injuries, according to the police’s statement. The vehicle has yet to be recovered.Through an investigation, police identified the suspect as Salaz. He is currently being held in the Eddy County Detention Center in Carlsbad, New Mexico.Salaz’s current charges in New Mexico include resisting, evading or obstructing an officer (arrest) and concealing identity. He will be extradited to Colorado at an unknown date, according to Grand Junction police. This is the latest in a troubling number of crimes and assaults involving Uber drivers and passengers. Concerns have been raised over the ride-sharing service’s safety after an 84-page report released last December revealed there were nearly 6,000 reports of sexual assault from both riders and drivers across the United States in 2017 and 2018. Overall, riders accounted for 45% of the accused parties. The report noted that some assaults occurred between riders. Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

May 18, 2021 | |Post a Comment

first_imgBytmonas/iStock(WASHINGTON) — More guns were found and detained from passengers or in carry-on bags at airport security checkpoints across the United States in 2019 than recorded in agency history, according to the Transportation Security Administration.The agency found 4,432 firearms at these checkpoints — a 5% increase from the previous year, the agency reported on Wednesday. Of the weapons discovered, the press release said 87% were loaded. Nearly 40% of those were found with a full round in the chamber, the TSA press release said.“The continued increase in the number of firearms that travelers bring to airport checkpoints is deeply troubling,” TSA Administrator David Pekoske said in the press release. “There is a proper way to travel safely with a firearm. First and foremost, it should be unloaded.”He added, “It should be packed in a hard-sided locked case, taken to the airline check-in counter to be declared, and checked.”TSA has set strict laws prohibiting passengers from bringing firearms aboard planes. They do, however, allow weapons with proper permits to travel in checked baggage, requiring that they are unloaded and packed in locked and hard-sided cases, with the ammunition stowed in its original box.Passengers who carry legally are also subject to local and state gun laws wherever they land.TSA officials detected these firearms at 278 airports nationwide last year. The press released named five cities where the most firearms were detected at checkpoints: Atlanta, Dallas-Fort Worth, Denver, Houston and Phoenix.The airports with the highest number of gun seizures in 2019 were:Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International with 323Dallas/Fort Worth International with 217Denver International with 140George Bush Intercontinental with 138Phoenix Sky Harbor International with 132The airports above were also on TSA’s list for 2018.Hartsfield-Jackson also set the record for most firearms detained in one month — 34 were found in May 2019.The checkpoints experienced a rocky start to 2019, as the United States was in the midst of one of the longest government shutdowns in history. The rate of unscheduled absences at airports throughout the country spiked, and security screening lines grew, forcing travelers to often wait longer than an hour — sometimes missing their flights.The Atlanta airport reported a breach of security in early 2019 — unrelated to the shutdown — when a passenger traveling to Japan successfully brought a gun through security and on to a Delta Airlines flight. The gun was not discovered until the passenger told Delta authorities what he had brought “upon arrival” in Japan.TSA also reminded travelers that individuals who are caught with firearms at airport security checkpoints are subject to federal civil penalties of up to $13,000.ABC News reached out to the agency for comment on next steps. Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

May 18, 2021 | |Post a Comment

first_imgAustin Police DepartmentBy Sabina Ghebremedhin, Cammeron Parrish and Meredith Deliso, ABC News(AUSTIN) — Austin police have arrested a man who allegedly pushed a park ranger into a lake.The incident occurred on Thursday at Commons Ford, a public park that is home to Lake Austin, and was captured on a video posted on social media. In the video, a park ranger is seen standing near the lake’s edge telling a crowd of people to stand six feet apart when a man pushes the ranger into the water and falls in himself.Police arrested Brandon Wicks, 25, on Thursday with attempted assault on a public service worker and damage of city property, including the ranger’s radio. He was released from Travis County Jail on Friday on a personal recognizance bond. It is not clear if he has a lawyer.The Austin Parks and Recreation Department said it was “saddened” by the incident.“Our rangers continue to engage residents on the proper use of park facilities during the COVID-19 pandemic,” Kimberly McNeeley, Austin parks & recreation department director, said in a statement. “We ask that the public treat Rangers with the same respect they wish to be shown to themselves. Public support is essential for Austin to meet the challenges of this pandemic.”The statement noted that rangers are not law enforcement officers but are essential workers “who’ve been on the front-line of the city’s response to COVID-19” and educate visitors on the operational changes at parks.The Austin parks department advises parkgoers to stay six feet away from strangers and to wear a face-covering if not exercising.The city of Austin’s stay-home order is in effect through Friday. Under the city’s order, anyone engaging in outdoor activity must maintain at least six feet of social distancing.Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

May 18, 2021 | |Post a Comment

first_imgABC News(MINNEAPOLIS) — BY: CHRISTINA CARREGA and WHITNEY LLOYDA week after George Floyd was seen on a bystander’s cellphone video gasping his last breaths with the knee of a former Minneapolis police officer pinned on his neck, three of the four former officers at the scene hadn’t been charged.That changed on Wednesday.Thomas Lane, J.A. Kueng and Tou Thoa each have been charged with second-degree aiding and abetting felony murder and second-degree aiding and abetting manslaughter, according to court documents. Charges against Derek Chauvin, who on May 29 was charged by Hennepin County prosecutors with third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter, have been upgraded to second-degree murder. Chauvin is in jail on $500,000 bond.All four officers were fired from the Minneapolis Police Department in the wake of Floyd’s death.Minnesota Attorney General Keith Ellison is expected to give an update on Wednesday afternoon.Ben Crump, an attorney for the Floyd family, has demanded that Kueng, Lane and Thoa are charged with acting in concert with Chauvin allegedly to murder Floyd.Minnesota attorney Jay Adkins told ABC News on Wednesday that the third-degree murder charges against Chauvin may have failed at trial.“The third-degree murder charges…is invalid in this case because the officer’s actions were directed only to Mr. Floyd not multiple people — like firing in a crowded building,” said Adkins, who cited a Minnesota Supreme Court case that reads “third-degree murder ‘cannot occur where the defendant’s actions were focused on a specific person.’”“The importance of the new second degree charges against former officer Chauvin. If the elevated charges don’t result in a conviction, the likely results would be a conviction to a form of manslaughter, not murder,” Adkins said.According to arrest warrant documents, Chauvin pinned his knee onto the back of Floyd’s neck for eight minutes and 46 seconds.During that time, Lane asked Chauvin whether Floyd should get rolled onto his side, but Chauvin refused to move him, according to the warrant. Lane allegedly was holding Floyd’s legs as Kueng allegedly was holding Floyd’s back down as Chauvin kept his knee in place, according to the arrest warrant. Thoa was seen on the video with both of his hands in his pockets.“Based on … their silence and based on their body cameras and audio, we know they did nothing … they all participated in the death of George Floyd,” Crump said at a press conference on Wednesday before the new charges were announced.A bystander recorded the incident on a cell phone. Floyd can be heard repeating pleading, “I can’t breathe,” and for his mother, who died years ago.An independent autopsy determined Floyd’s cause of death was by asphyxia “due to neck and back compression that led to a lack of blood flow to the brain.” The county’s medical examiner ruled that Floyd died because of a cardiopulmonary arrest.Crump said in a statement that Ellison informed the Floyd family “that his office will continue to investigate and will upgrade the charges to first-degree murder if the evidence supports it.”Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

May 18, 2021 | |Post a Comment

first_imgOvidiu Dugulan/iStockBy MORGAN WINSOR, IVAN PEREIRA and MEREDITH DELISO, ABC News(NEW YORK) — A pandemic of the novel coronavirus has now killed more than 502,000 people worldwide.Over 10.1 million people across the globe have been diagnosed with COVID-19, the disease caused by the new respiratory virus, according to data compiled by the Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins University. The actual numbers are believed to be much higher due to testing shortages, many unreported cases and suspicions that some governments are hiding the scope of their nations’ outbreaks. Since the first cases were detected in China in December, the United States has become the worst-affected country, with more than 2.5 million diagnosed cases and at least 125,928 deaths. Here’s how the news developed Monday. All times Eastern:11:17 p.m.: IRS won’t postpone tax filing deadlineThe Department of the Treasury and IRS announced that the current tax filing and payment deadline of July 15 will not be postponed.The original deadline to file was April 15, but it was postponed three months due to the pandemic.Individual taxpayers unable to meet the July 15 due date can request an automatic extension of time to file until Oct. 15, but it is not an extension to pay taxes due.For those facing hardship due to the crisis, the IRS is offering a number of payment options.“The IRS understands that those affected by the coronavirus may not be able to pay their balances in full by July 15, but we have many payment options to help taxpayers,” said IRS Commissioner Chuck Rettig in a statement published on the IRS website. “These easy-to-use payment options are available on IRS.gov, and most can be done automatically without reaching out to an IRS representative.” 8:42 p.m.: Los Angeles beaches to close July 4th weekendLos Angeles County beaches will be closed during the Fourth of July weekend, the county’s Lost Hills Sheriff’s Station said.Beaches, piers, beach bike paths and beach access points will be closed from Friday through Monday, officials said. Trespassers will be subject to a $1,000 fine, police said.The measure comes amid rising COVID-19 cases and hospitalizations in the county. Earlier Monday, Los Angeles became the first county in the country to hit 100,000 cases.8:12 p.m.: Arizona bars, gyms, movie theaters to close for a monthArizona Gov. Doug Ducey has ordered bars, indoor gyms, indoor movie theaters, water parks and tubing operators to pause operations, as the state sees a surge in new COVID-19 cases and hospitalizations.The order is effective Monday at 8 p.m. local time and will last until July 27, unless extended.Bars can still provide take-out and curbside service.The state is also delaying the start of the school year to Aug. 17 and prohibiting gatherings of more than 50 people. Arizona schools typically open as early as July.Most businesses were able to resume operations when the state’s stay-at-home order expired in mid-May.On Sunday, Arizona saw a record 3,858 new daily COVID-19 cases, and a record 2,691 hospitalizations.7:05 p.m.: Los Angeles County surpasses 100,000 COVID-19 casesLos Angeles County has become the first county in the country to hit 100,000 cases of COVID-19.The county has also reported its largest daily increase of new cases, with 2,903. It now has 100,772 total cases.Only seven states in the U.S. have more than 100,000 cases, according to data collected by the COVID Tracking Project: California, Florida, Illinois, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York and Texas.Los Angeles County’s public health director, Barbara Ferrer, blamed the increase on businesses and individuals “who haven’t followed the directives,” by failing to physically distance at businesses and having close contact with those outside their household.The county’s seven-day testing positivity rate has risen to nearly 9%, and hospitalizations have increased 27% in the last two weeks, officials said.Ferrer said the increase in cases, positivity rates and hospitalizations is “alarming.”“If you’re not part of the solution to slowing the spread, you’re ending up being part of the problem,” she said.5:32 p.m.: U.S. airlines to strengthen travel policiesAll major U.S. airlines will now require passengers to answer a health assessment during the check-in process, which includes agreeing to wear a face mask on board.Airlines for America, the industry trade organization representing seven U.S. airlines, announced the new procedures for all passengers. They include agreeing to wear a face covering at the airport, on the jet bridge and on the plane; offering assurance that they are free of COVID-19 symptoms, such as coughing or loss of taste or smell; and offering assurance that they have not had exposure to someone who tested positive or had COVID-19 symptoms in the last 14 days.Alaska Airlines, American Airlines, Delta Air Lines, Hawaiian Airlines, JetBlue Airways, Southwest Airlines and United Airlines now or will require passengers to complete the temporary health acknowledgment during the check-in process, the organization said.3:06 p.m.: WHO official warns pandemic is not close to overOfficials from the World Health Organization gave strong warnings about the pandemic, telling reporters COVID-19 is “not even close to being over.”Tuesday marks the six-month anniversary since the organization was first notified about the virus and WHO Director-General Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said people need to reflect on the progress made and the road ahead.“None of us could have imagined how our world, and our lives would be thrown into turmoil by this new virus,” he said.Tedros urged global solidarity in fighting the disease and increases seen across the world.“The worst is yet to come,” he said.2:38 p.m.: New Jersey backtracks on planned indoor dining reopeningGov. Phil Murphy announced that New Jersey will pause its reopening of the state’s indoor dining, which was slated for Thursday.Murphy cited “spikes” in cases in other parts of the country where restrictions on indoor dining were lifted. “We have been cautious throughout every step of our restart,” he tweeted. “We’ve always said that we would not hesitate to hit pause if needed to safeguard public health. This is one of those times.”2:15 p.m.: Utah governor urges Pence to encourage face coveringsUtah Gov. Gary Herbert told Vice President Mike Pence during his weekly conference call with governors that his state is becoming complacent and led to a “spike” in cases over the last three or four weeks, according to audio obtained by ABC News.While Herbert, a Republican, stressed that the state’s fatality rate is .8%, he urged Pence and the president to send a message to the public that wearing a face covering is the best way to fight the pandemic.“I think mister vice president if you and President Trump could say — not as necessarily a mandate but as a best practice, ‘If you want to stop the spread, if you want to slow down the spread, as a best practice … we recommend that you wear a mask,’” Herbert said.Pence responded by reiterating that the administration would support leaders who promote face coverings.“We were in Texas yesterday and we made it very clear that people should wear a mask whenever state local authorities indicate that it’s appropriate, or when social distancing is not possible,” the vice president said.2:07 p.m.: Planet Fitness responds to case in West Virginia locationPlanet Fitness said it is working with local health officials after one of its members tested positive for the novel coronavirus in West Virginia.More than 200 people who use the gym on Fort Pierpont Drive in Morgantown have been asked to quarantine themselves for 14 days.“At Planet Fitness, the safety of our team and members is our top priority,” company spokeswoman McCall Gosselin told ABC News in a statement Monday. “We have been in communication with the Monongalia County Health Department upon being notified that a member in our Morgantown, WV location tested positive for COVID-19. Out of an abundance of caution, the club is temporarily closed for deep cleaning and we are not aware of any additional members or team members reporting symptoms at this time. We will continue to take every necessary precaution to ensure the safety of our community, and we have taken a number of steps across all of our locations, which include enhanced cleanliness and sanitization policies and procedures, extensive training for staff, physical distancing measures, reducing physical touch points in the club with touchless check-in, and more.”1:30 p.m.: WHO official asked about Trump’s ‘kung-flu’ commentsOfficials from the World Health Organization were asked during their daily briefing about their thoughts on the president using racist terminology to talk about the pandemic.WHO emergencies Chief Dr. Mike Ryan didn’t refer to Trump by name but said, “many people have used unfortunate language in this response.” During a rally in Tulsa, Oklahoma, Trump referred to the pandemic as “kung-flu,” to a laughing crowd of supporters.“It is unfortunate if our global discourse is reduced to base language. That never helps,” Ryan said.The official added WHO would like to see a discourse that was more appropriate from all world leaders.“In that sense, we encourage all people, at all levels, and in all countries to use language that is appropriate, respectful and is not associated with any connotations that are negative,” Ryan said.WHO officials added they are sending a team to China to investigate the virus’ origins and emphasized the important of strong contact tracing programs.12:21 p.m.: Cuomo pushes Trump to mandate face coverings as cases decline in NYNew York Gov. Andrew Cuomo slammed the federal government and other states for not doing enough to curb the rise in COVID-19 cases and urged them to enforce safeguards.Cuomo specifically called on President Donald Trump to sign an executive order that would mandate face coverings across the nation.“We did it two months ago … the other states are just starting to this now,” he said. “Let the president lead by example. Let the president put a mask on.”Cuomo said he is concerned that the rise of coronavirus cases would hurt New York, which was once the epicenter of the pandemic but is now on a decline in the number of cases and deaths. At its peak in the beginning of April, the state saw its three-day average of new COVID-19 deaths around 763, and on Sunday, that three-day average was eight, according to Cuomo.The governor also unveiled a sculpture of a mountain made of Styrofoam that he said symbolized the state’s coronavirus case curve.“I wanted to show New Yorkers what they did,” he said. “And remember what we went through.”11:39 a.m.: Broadway shows suspended for rest of yearNew York City’s iconic Broadway shows will be suspended through the rest of the year due to the coronavirus pandemic.The Broadway League, the national trade association for the Broadway industry, made the announcement Monday, saying theaters are now offering refunds and exchanges for tickets purchased for all performances through Jan. 3, 2021. The organization said it’s working with city and state officials as well as key experts “to formulate the best plan to restart the industry.”Broadway shows were initially suspended on March 12 at the start of the pandemic. There were 31 productions running at that time, while an additional eight were in rehearsals preparing to open in the spring.Returning productions are currently projected to resume performances over a series of rolling dates early next year. Tickets for performances next winter and spring are expected to go on sale in the coming weeks, according to the Broadway League.“The Broadway experience can be deeply personal but it is also, crucially, communal,” Thomas Schumacher, chair of the board of the Broadway League, said in a statement Monday. “The alchemy of 1000 strangers bonding into a single audience fueling each performer on stage and behind the scenes will be possible again when Broadway theatres can safely host full houses. Every single member of our community is eager to get back to work sharing stories that inspire our audience through the transformative power of a shared live experience. The safety of our cast, crew, orchestra and audience is our highest priority and we look forward to returning to our stages only when it’s safe to do so. One thing is for sure, when we return we will be stronger and more needed than ever.”11:02 a.m.: New York City’s indoor dining ‘now in question,’ mayor saysWhile New York City prepares to enter the next phase of its reopening plan, Mayor Bill de Blasio said Monday that indoor dining “is now in question.”De Blasio said the city is on track to move into phase three of reopening next Monday, but he will reexamine the indoor dining element and possibly pause or modify it. The mayor said he will have more to say on the issue in the coming days.However, de Blasio said outdoor dining is “clearly working.” The mayor announced that barbecue areas in the city’s parks will be reopened for the upcoming Fourth of July weekend.New York City, once the epicenter of the novel coronavirus outbreak in the United States, entered phase two of reopening last week, which allowed restaurants to resume outdoor dining services.De Blasio said the COVID-19 indicators — including the daily number of hospitalizations and patients in intensive care — remain below the desired thresholds.“The New York City story is pretty damn good,” the mayor told reporters Monday.10:36 a.m.: UK needs an interventionist approach to economy, prime minister saysThe United Kingdom should take an activist and interventionist approach to the economy to help it recover from the coronavirus crisis, British Prime Minister Boris Johnson said Monday.“I believe personally that what the government has got to do right now is keep going with an activist, interventionist approach,” Johnson told reporters. “But that’s the way also to get business to be confident, to start investing, to start taking people back and start creating new jobs and driving new growth.”The United Kingdom has been hit hard by the coronavirus pandemic. The country has one of the highest death tolls from COVID-19 in the world, after the United States and Brazil.Meanwhile, a recent forecast from the Bank of England predicts the United Kingdom is heading for its worst economic downturn in more than 300 years.9:05 a.m.: Putin says he ‘regularly’ gets tested for COVID-19Russian President Vladimir Putin said he gets tested for the novel coronavirus every “three to four days,” according to a new interview with state-run television channel Rossiya-1.So far, Putin said all his tests results have been negative, “thank god.”The Russian leader admitted that having to work from home was a challenge for him because he enjoys having direct communication with other people.On Monday, Russia’s coronavirus headquarters reported 6,719 new cases of COVID-19, bringing the nationwide total to 641,156. Russia has the third-highest number of diagnosed cases in the world, after the United States and Brazil, according to a count kept by Johns Hopkins University.Russia’s death toll from the disease now stands at 9,166, after an additional 93 patients died over the past 24 hours, according to the country’s coronavirus headquarters.8:20 a.m.: Americans must ‘act responsibly,’ health secretary saysAmid a rise in coronavirus infections across the United States, Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar is calling on Americans to practice social distancing and wear face masks as people return to work and school.“We have all got to as Americans act responsibly, even as we reopen and get back to work, get back to school and get back to health care, we’ve got to practice social distancing. We’ve got to use face coverings when we can’t practice social distancing,” Azar told ABC News chief anchor George Stephanopoulos in an interview Monday on Good Morning America.Many areas in the southern part of the country are now experiencing “very serious outbreaks,” where the average age of people testing positive for COVID-19 is reportedly 35 or younger and many are asymptomatic, according to Azar.“We have a lot more tools now than we had two months ago,” he said, “but still there is a heavy burden on us in terms of our collective responsibility as individuals when we reopen.”7:12 a.m.: Trump secures half a million treatment courses of remdesivirU.S. President Donald Trump has secured half a million treatment courses of remdesivir for American hospitals through September, Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar announced Monday.It’s the first antiviral medication to show effectiveness against the novel coronavirus in human clinical trials.“This is the drug that, if you’re hospitalized, can reduce the length of your stay by a third,” Azar told ABC News chief anchor George Stephanopoulos in an interview Monday on Good Morning America.The deal between the Trump administration and California-based drug maker Gilean Sciences allows U.S. hospitals to purchase remdesivir in amounts allocated by the Department of Human and Health Services as well as state health departments.The federal government is working with states to make sure the drug “gets to the hospitals most in need,” Azar added.Gilead originally developed remdesivir to treat patients with Ebola virus disease. In May, the Food and Drug Administration authorized the drug for emergency use to treat patients hospitalized with severe cases of COVID-19. Since then, the U.S. government has been distributing treatment courses of remdesivir that were donated by Gilead.There is currently no FDA-approved products to treat or prevent COVID-19.Gilead announced Monday that it will charge $2,340 for a typical treatment course of remdesivir for patients covered by government health programs in the United States and other developed nations where the drug is authorized for use. The price would be $3,120 for patients with private health insurance in the United States.6:18 a.m.: Over 200 urged to quarantine after positive case at a Planet FitnessMore than 200 people in West Virginia are being asked to quarantine themselves and watch for symptoms after a gymgoer tested positive for COVID-19.The positive case is a client of Planet Fitness on Fort Pierpont Drive in Morgantown, and the Monongalia County Health Department is now urging members who were there between 9 a.m. and 3 p.m. local time on June 24 to stay home for 14 days since being exposed. An estimated 205 people were at the gym during that window of time.ABC News has reached out to Planet Fitness for comment.The individuals should not leave their homes until July 8 or unless to seek medical care. Those who develop symptoms should contact their primary care provider and get tested.“They also should do their best to stay away from others in their household,” Dr. Lee B. Smith, Monongalia County health officer and executive director of the county’s health department, said in a statement Saturday. “Ways to do this would be to stay primarily in one area of the home and to wear a mask if you must be around others.”West Virginia has seen an uptick in coronavirus infections in recent weeks. In the past 10 days, the Mountain State has reported an increase of about 400 COVID-19 cases. In the 10 days prior to that, the case count climbed by about 240, according to health officials.As of late Saturday afternoon, West Virginia had reported a total of 2,782 confirmed COVID-19 cases. Monongalia County currently has 152 cases, up 21 cases in the past 10 days, health officials said.Residents are encouraged to wear masks in public, wash hands thoroughly and often, and maintain a distance of six feet from others.“These measures have proven to slow the spread of COVID-19,” Dr. Smith said. “If we want to continue to open up businesses and avoid the need to reverse some of the steps we have taken, people must take these precautions seriously.”5:52 a.m.: New York records lowest rise in deaths since MarchNew York Gov. Andrew Cuomo announced on Sunday the state’s lowest death toll and hospitalizations from COVID-19 since the pandemic began.Just five new deaths were reported in New York state on Saturday — the lowest single-day increase since March 15. The statewide death toll now stands at 24,830, according to Cuomo.Hospitalizations also continued to drop — now below 900 — and less than 1% of COVID-19 tests were positive on Saturday, Cuomo said.There were 616 new cases confirmed, bringing the statewide total to 392,539, according to Cuomo.New York, once the epicenter of the coronavirus epidemic in the United States, and other northeastern states have made major progress in recovering from their outbreaks. Meanwhile, several southern and western states are experiencing an alarming surge in new infections.An ABC News analysis found that seven states — Arizona, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, South Carolina, Tennessee and Utah — have seen a record number of new cases since Friday.4:39 a.m.: China sees decline in new casesChina on Monday reported just 12 new confirmed cases of COVID-19 and no new deaths, as the country which was the original epicenter of the coronavirus pandemic continues to see a downward trend in infections.Five of the new cases were imported from overseas while seven were cases of domestic transmission in Beijing, where more than 8 million of the city’s 21 million residents have been tested for the novel coronavirus in recent weeks. The Chinese capital has seen a recent spike in infections, though the number of new cases reported there on Monday was down by half from the previous day, according to China’s National Health Commission.Overall, the Chinese mainland has reported 83,512 confirmed cases of COVID-19 with at least 4,634 deaths. There are still 418 patients receiving treatment for the disease, while another 112 are under observation for testing positive without showing any symptoms or for being suspected cases, according to the National Health Commission.3:42 a.m.: US reports more than 38,800 new casesMore than 38,800 new cases of COVID-19 were identified in the United States on Sunday, according to a count kept by Johns Hopkins University.The latest daily caseload is down from the country’s record high of more than 45,000 new cases identified last Friday.The national total currently stands at 2,549,028 diagnosed cases with at least 125,803 deaths.The new cases include people from all 50 U.S. states, Washington, D.C., and other U.S. territories as well as repatriated citizens.By May 20, all states had begun lifting stay-at-home orders and other restrictions put in place to curb the spread of the novel coronavirus. The day-to-day increase in cases then hovered around 20,000 for a couple of weeks before shooting back up to over 30,000 and then crossing 40,000 last week.Nearly half of all 50 states have seen a rise in infections in recent weeks, with some — such as Florida, South Carolina and Georgia — reporting daily records.ABC News’ Alina Lobzina, Katherine Faulders, Marilyn Heck, Matthew Fuhrman, Bonnie Mclean, Sam Sweeney and Christine Theodorou contributed to this report.Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

May 18, 2021 | |Post a Comment

first_imgMarianVejcik/iStockBy MEREDITH DELISO, ABC News(BOSTON) — Hundreds of people gathered Sunday to protest a new flu vaccine mandate for Massachusetts students, enacted as school districts prepare to reopen during the coronavirus pandemic.At the demonstration in front of the Massachusetts State House in Boston, protesters — some of them children — held signs that read “Unavoidably unsafe,” “My child, my choice,” “Parents call the shots” and “I am not a threat.” “No forced shots” was written in chalk in front of the statehouse. Many demonstrators were not wearing masks or social distancing, according to photos and videos taken of the event.The protest follows an Aug. 19 announcement from state officials that influenza immunization will be required for all children ages 6 months or older who are attending Massachusetts child care, pre-school, kindergarten, and K-12. Full-time undergraduate and graduate students under 30 and all full and part-time health science students attending school in the state must also get the vaccine.Several protesters said that the flu shot should be a choice — an argument frequently used against mask mandates, including in schools — due to the pandemic.“The flu vaccine should not be a mandate. It should be a choice,” Jessica Marchant told ABC Boston affiliate WCVB.Other protesters told the station they believe state officials are “taking advantage” of the fear caused by the virus.“I think parents are vulnerable right now. They need their kids to go to school and they backed us into a corner,” Taryn Proulx told WCVB-TV. “We feel like we have to just comply or rearrange our whole lives and homeschool our children.”The mandate comes as experts are bracing for what some have called a “twindemic” of COVID-19 and the flu. Children are more vulnerable to the seasonal flu than COVID-19, medical experts told ABC News. Those under 5 years old are at the highest risk of developing serious flu-related complications, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.“It is more important now than ever to get a flu vaccine because flu symptoms are very similar to those of COVID-19 and preventing the flu will save lives and preserve health care resources,” Dr. Larry Madoff, medical director of the Massachusetts Department of Public Health’s Bureau of Infectious Disease and Laboratory Sciences, said in a statement announcing the flu requirement.Under the mandate, students must now receive the vaccine annually by Dec. 31. Medical or religious exemptions are allowed. Home-schooled or off-campus college students are also exempt. Elementary and secondary students who are remote are not exempt.A majority of school districts in the state, including Boston, plan to reopen in the coming weeks with hybrid learning, according to an analysis by WCVB.Massachusetts has some of the highest vaccination rates in the country. During the 2018-2019 flu season, 81% of children ages 6 months to 17 years and 53.5% of adults got the vaccine, according to the CDC.Massachusetts is the first state to mandate the flu vaccine for all children and joins a handful of states that already require it for child care and/or preschool enrollees, according to research by the Immunization Action Coalition.Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

May 18, 2021 | |Post a Comment

first_imgBlakeDavidTaylor/iStockBy MEREDITH DELISO, ABC News(BUFFALO, N.Y.) — Police arrested a 25-year-old woman in a hit-and-run incident during demonstrations in Buffalo earlier this week over a Kentucky grand jury’s decision not to charge three police officers in the death of Breonna Taylor.The Buffalo Police Department said it charged Joanna Gollnau, 25, of Buffalo, on Friday with felony reckless endangerment in the first degree and reckless driving for allegedly striking a bicyclist with her pickup truck during a protest in Niagara Square on Wednesday night.The incident in Buffalo unfolded as protesters marched in the street near Niagara Square in the downtown area in the hours following the announcement of the grand jury’s decision in the fatal Louisville police shooting of Taylor.Graphic video taken by ABC affiliate station WKBW-TV in Buffalo showed a maroon and white king-cab pickup truck drive directly into a group of demonstrators who pounded on the side of the truck and yelled for the driver to stop just before a protester on a bicycle was hit. The footage shows the truck speeding away as protesters on foot gave chase.Buffalo police officials said the driver was eventually stopped by officers and detained for questioning.A spokesperson for Slow Roll Buffalo, a nonprofit community group of bicycle enthusiasts, said that the woman who was hit by the truck is a member of its board of directors. She is now home and feeling fine, the organization said on Friday.Buffalo Police Captain Jeff Rinaldo told WKBW that the department used video footage, including social media posts and city surveillance cameras, in its investigation. He told the station he was unsure of a motive, and that Gollnau has been cooperating with police. She is set to be arraigned on Nov. 3, according to WKBW.A similar incident unfolded in Denver Wednesday night. Video taken by ABC affiliate station KMGH-TV in Denver showed a silver Volvo station wagon approach demonstrators marching in the street outside the state Capitol Building and then stopped. Several protesters were standing in front of the vehicle and banging on its hood as the car moved forward and accelerated, knocking one female protester to the ground, the footage showed. The driver sped away but was stopped by police and detained, police said on Twitter.The two incidents came just hours after a Kentucky grand jury indicted former Louisville police officer Brett Hankison on three counts of wanton endangerment in the first degree in the shooting that killed Taylor, but neither he nor the other two officers involved in the fatal encounter were charged in her death.The two hit-and-runs on Wednesday marked the latest in a series of incidents in recent months in which protesters have been struck while marching in demonstrations against police brutality and racial injustice. On July 4, a protester was killed and another was injured when a car barreled into a Black Lives Matter protest on a closed freeway in Seattle.ABC News’ Bill Hutchinson contributed to this report.Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more