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March 2, 2021 | |Post a Comment

first_imgPhoto: Andrew Blackstein On Friday night, Phish made their triumphant return to New York City’s Madison Square Garden, opening up their sold-out four-night run of New Year’s shows at The World’s Most Famous Arena. Flying high off of an incredibly creative and well-received Las Vegas Halloween run, the seasoned four-piece picked right up from where they left off in early November, delivering a high-octane two-set performance. Everyone in the Manhattan arena felt the feelings they’d forgotten, as Phish worked through some impressive second-takes on Kasvot Växt material, and also brought back memories of 2017’s untouchable 13-night Baker’s Dozen run.Phish got the show on the road with “We Are Come To Outlive Our Brains”, or as some have already started to refer to as “WACTOOB”, immediately bringing the sold-out crowd back to the brilliance the band first unveiled at Las Vegas’ MGM Grand Garden Arena, and also counted as a first for many in attendance. The second delivery ever of “We Are Outcome To Live Our Brains” had some serious girth to it, as Trey Anastasio got his chance to take the jam out twice as far, clearly indicating his intents for another rowdy night in arguably Phish’s favorite venue.Following a brief pause, “Martian Monster” came next, as Vermont’s finest quartet locked into the tune’s signature infectious groove. Anastasio once again took things into his own hands, spitting out some firey hot guitar licks, with Page McConnell following closely behind. It was evident Jon Fishman and Mike Gordon were loose and ready to attack, as the rhythm section anchored the band’s uncontainable energy moving forward with “Axilla”. The standard “Axilla” led way to “Free”, as the Madison Square Garden crowd immediately silenced themselves and locked in with the four masterminds on stage.Gordon laid down his first bass-bombs of the night leading into “Free”, as a breezy sensation drifted across the room, accompanied by Anastasio’s opening lyrics. With Fishman strutting his stuff into a contagious hi-hat centered rhythm, Anastasio quickly looked to his pedalboard, charging into a roaring guitar solo.  A solid take on “The Wedge” was next, before Gordon led his bandmates into “Meat”. Friday night’s rendition of “Meat” was particularly slowed down and funky, with the band utilizing their rhythmic breakdowns as a creative outlet for Anastasio and McConnell to bounce off of.Following a final segment of Page hammering away on his grand piano, the jam smoothly segued into “Ghost”, as Trey stared directly into the center of the venue’s ceiling with a deadly glare in his eyes. Trey and Page took no time to move away from the compositional structure of “Ghost”, quickly finding themselves in some delicate interplay, as all four members eventually locked in and slowed down the groove. Longtime lighting designer Chris Kuroda left the latch unhooked throughout the night, rocking his ever-evolving monstrosity of a light rig in all dimensions, as rainbow beams blasted the enthusiastic crowd.As “Ghost” fizzled out, the band quickly hopped into “Sparkle”, which led way to the somewhat rarity “If I Could, despite being played 2 shows prior in Las Vegas. Anastasio, Gordon, and McConnell shined as a vocal unit, belting out, “flipping backwards through the doors and through the windows”, before moving forward with “Maze”. Following Anastasio’s opening lyrics, Fishman and Gordon paved the way for McConnell to blaze into his solo on the clav, before quickly hopping in between his grand piano, dazzling the crowd with an electric whirlwind of a solo. Fishman continued to hold down the pocket, as Anastasio let it all hang out with a tenacious, ever-evolving solo. A rocking take on “Walls Of The Cave” brought Phish’s ambitious first set to a close.Following a brief set break, Trey let out the opening riff for “Set Your Soul Free”, immediately setting a launchpad for his bandmates to dive head-first into Type II territory. “Set Your Soul Free”, which was debuted earlier this summer at the Gorge, allowed McConnell to flex his chops on the keys, as the band soared into a blissful, free-flowing segment. Fishman continued pushing forward, with Anastasio jumping around between his complex assortment of effects. Up next was the glorious return of “Swept Away” into “Steep”, played for the first time this year, and last played at Phish’s  “maple” themed night during their now iconic Baker’s Dozen run.Although the segue didn’t contain an extended jam à la Baker’s Dozen, the Madison Square Garden crowd was bouncing around the room, as Phish stealthily whipped out their second 2018 Halloween song back into the mix with “The Final Hurrah”. In similar suit as the show opening “We Are Come To Outlive Our Brains”, Phish took “The Final Hurrah” out for a silky-smooth ride, ambitiously pushing deep into improvisational territory. The band was beaming with shit-eating grins from ear-to-ear, as they showered the crowd with the beloved recent debut, adding an extra element of funk-fueled treatment.Following a quick chance to catch their breaths, the band moved into “Fuego”, setting the mood for the remainder of the evening  which was chock-full of free-flowing psychedelic Phish. Trey and Page made sure to keep things rolling, as Page powered through a continuous path of explosive work on his grand piano. The band continued down their heavily-focused exploratory path with “Shade”, before moving into a noteworthy take on “Bathtub Gin”. Friday night’s “Gin” encompassed the band’s deepest desires to continue pushing their creative bar with scents and subtle sounds of their Halloween show, before bringing the second set to a close with “Possum”. The soul-drenched one-two punch of “Bouncing Around The Room” and “Slave to the Traffic Light” in the encore slot suggests that Phish is ready to continue their quest of burning Madison Square Garden down.Setlist: Phish | Madison Square Garden | New York, NY | 12/28/2018Set One : We Are Come To Outlive Our Brains, Martian Monster, Axilla > Free, The Wedge, Meat > Ghost > Sparkle, If I Could, Maze, Walls Of The CaveSet Two: Set Your Soul Free > Swept Away > Steep, The Final Hurrah, Fuego > Shade > Bathtub Gin > PossumEncore: Bouncing Around The Room, Slave To The Traffic Light Load remaining imageslast_img read more

January 26, 2021 | |Post a Comment

first_img “It really seems like people had fun,” she said. “All the players who were expected to come made it.” Junior Andrew Alea, president of The Shirt Committee, said by 3:30 p.m., people were already lined up to get their shirt. Former wide receiver Golden Tate’s image is on the front of the shirt along with the words, “Shake down the thunder.” The images for this year were chosen to help represent the past, present and future of Notre Dame football, Alea said. “The front is kind of cool, because [Tate] was No. 23, and this is the 23rd year for The Shirt,” Couey said. “By the time The Shirt was unveiled, there was a line of about 150 to 200 people waiting to get theirs,” he said. “The original image [of Hughes] is of him leading the team out of the tunnel,” Alea said. “His look, his pose is exactly what we are looking for in terms of a fierce Notre Dame player.” Despite rainy weather and cold temperatures Friday afternoon, students and fans still showed up en masse in front of the Hammes Notre Dame Bookstore to see this year’s design unveiled. “[The Shirt committee] wanted to make a shirt that is intense,” he said. “We wanted an ‘in your face’ shirt, we wanted to make [the design] pop.” Alea said the committee chose navy blue as their color to complement the powerful imagery they chose for the design. Alea said there is no pattern to choosing the color for The Shirt each year – rather, each committee chooses a color to best match their theme. Junior Lauren Couey, The Shirt’s unveiling coordinator, said considering the poor weather conditions, the turnout was “awesome.” Alea said “Shake down the thunder” was chosen as the text for the front because it is an iconic Notre Dame phrase, conveying the powerful sense of tradition The Shirt Committee strove for. “It represents the traditions …  We’re been fierce and always will be fierce,” he said. “We wanted to modernize the design of The Shirt and make it in-your-face, and I think we did a really great job of doing that.”,This year, the unveiling of The Shirt “shook down the thunder.” Despite rainy weather and cold temperatures Friday afternoon, students and fans still showed up en masse in front of the Hammes Notre Dame Bookstore to see this year’s design unveiled. Junior Lauren Couey, The Shirt’s unveiling coordinator, said considering the poor weather conditions, the turnout was “awesome.” “It really seems like people had fun,” she said. “All the players who were expected to come made it.” Junior Andrew Alea, president of The Shirt Committee, said by 3:30 p.m., people were already lined up to get their shirt. “By the time The Shirt was unveiled, there was a line of about 150 to 200 people waiting to get theirs,” he said. This year’s design is much different than those of previous years, Alea said. “[The Shirt committee] wanted to make a shirt that is intense,” he said. “We wanted an ‘in your face’ shirt, we wanted to make [the design] pop.” Alea said the committee chose navy blue as their color to complement the powerful imagery they chose for the design. “We wanted navy blue, because it’s a Notre Dame color, and especially with the powerful imagery, we thought the navy blue would help the white text pop better,” he said. Alea said there is no pattern to choosing the color for The Shirt each year – rather, each committee chooses a color to best match their theme. The images for this year were chosen to help represent the past, present and future of Notre Dame football, Alea said. “The players on The Shirt each represent something,” he said. “We chose [former running back] Alan Pinkett and [former wide receiver] Tim Brown [for] the back, because they are celebrating the past of Notre Dame football.” Pinkett and Brown’s pictures are shown in black and white to reflect their influence on the football program’s past. Former tailback Robert Hughes is also on the back of the shirt, but in color. “The original image [of Hughes] is of him leading the team out of the tunnel,” Alea said. “His look, his pose is exactly what we are looking for in terms of a fierce Notre Dame player.” The back of the shirt also features both the official 125th anniversary-year logo of the football program, and text about pride and tradition of the team. “We liked the look of a player running out of The Shirt, but moreover, we liked the look of a player running out of the traditions behind The Shirt and the football program,” Alea said. Former wide receiver Golden Tate’s image is on the front of the shirt along with the words, “Shake down the thunder.” “The front is kind of cool, because [Tate] was No. 23, and this is the 23rd year for The Shirt,” Couey said. Alea said “Shake down the thunder” was chosen as the text for the front because it is an iconic Notre Dame phrase, conveying the powerful sense of tradition The Shirt Committee strove for. “It represents the traditions …  We’re been fierce and always will be fierce,” he said. “We wanted to modernize the design of The Shirt and make it in-your-face, and I think we did a really great job of doing that.” “We wanted navy blue, because it’s a Notre Dame color, and especially with the powerful imagery, we thought the navy blue would help the white text pop better,” he said. This year’s design is much different than those of previous years, Alea said. The back of the shirt also features both the official 125th anniversary-year logo of the football program, and text about pride and tradition of the team. “We liked the look of a player running out of The Shirt, but moreover, we liked the look of a player running out of the traditions behind The Shirt and the football program,” Alea said. This year, the unveiling of The Shirt “shook down the thunder.” Former tailback Robert Hughes is also on the back of the shirt, but in color. “The players on The Shirt each represent something,” he said. “We chose [former running back] Alan Pinkett and [former wide receiver] Tim Brown [for] the back, because they are celebrating the past of Notre Dame football.” Pinkett and Brown’s pictures are shown in black and white to reflect their influence on the football program’s past.last_img read more

January 26, 2021 | |Post a Comment

first_imgDr. Joshua John Diehl of the LOGAN Center, a Center for Social Concerns resource that focuses on supporting people with disabilities, visited Spes Unica Hall at Saint Mary’s on Friday for the first of several colloquiums about autism-related topics this year. The event was sponsored by the Saint Mary’s Master of Autism Studies program.Diehl discussed the impact an autism diagnosis for one child can have on families of the child — especially for siblings. As evidence, Diehl cited his own experiences with his brother, Shane, and his research from working with siblings at the LOGAN Center.  “A lot of the previous research [is] on how having an autistic sibling can lead to behavioral issues,” Diehl said. “It’s all clinical. There’s not a lot on the actual relationship between siblings, which is unfortunate because the relationships can be beautiful and they’re a lot more complex than just what could go wrong.”Shane, Diehl’s younger brother, has a developmental disability, Diehl said.“Shane is my inspiration,” he said. “He has trouble communicating, but we know him. He’s his own person, he loves the Wisconsin Badgers and has a great sense of humor.” Diehl said he has explained his struggles with describing Shane to friends. It is a struggle many siblings face, he said, when pondering whether to lead descriptions with the disability and all that it entails, or by describing the person who enjoys jokes and planning his or her own birthday party. “There is also a level of consciousness in public and at home most siblings have that others don’t,” Diehl said. “It’s the stigma of how your sibling acts, and the fact that they are different from your friends’ siblings of the same age.”Diehl said he felt he needed to take care of Shane as a child. He promised his mother he would take care of his brother and did all he could to include Shane while growing up, but it became difficult later in life when Diehl went away for college and began to build his own family. Now, Diehl said, Shane is doing well. He has a job and lives in a home with his friends. However, Diehl’s research shows many siblings possess that uncertainty about the future and the need to help their parents and sibling without being a burden. “A lot of siblings feel the need to only emphasize the good side of their relationship with an autistic brother or sister,” Diehl said. “They just refuse to talk negatively about them. The problem is, any sibling relationship, developmental disability or otherwise, has its ups and downs. We must be willing to discuss all aspects of the relationship, good and bad.”Not talking about issues can be a problem, Diehl said.“Siblings often have trouble talking to parents and peers about their own issues,” he said. “There is a stigma around it and although many siblings have a strong desire to talk about it with someone who understands, they just don’t have the opportunity.”The most important relationship in early childhood is that of siblings, Diehl asserted, and children who have developmentally-delayed siblings should be able to create and maintain those relationships without sacrificing their own desires.Diehl acknowledged there are also difficulties for parents — they have a tendency to compare siblings or describe their children based on whether or not they have a disability. “The most important thing is that parents are aware of how they sound and what they say,” Diehl said. “They need to make their children aware that they are open to listening, discussion and to take advantage of any opportunity to talk.”Tags: disabilities, Joshua John Diehl, logan center, Master of Autism Studieslast_img read more

January 26, 2021 | |Post a Comment

first_imgAt their weekly meeting, the Notre Dame student senate met with the sophomore class council leaders to discuss the new policy regarding off-campus seniors’ ability to participate in formal dorm events. Members of the sophomore class council had been meeting with vice president for student affairs Erin Hoffmann Harding and associate vice president for residential life Heather Rackoczy Russell about the school’s intentions with the change and potential modifications to the policy.Sophomore class council president Jordan Theriault said the administration was interested in working with students to modify new residential life policies announced last spring.“From what they gathered from the students, there seemed to be some sort of confusion between about what the relationship with off-campus seniors was, whether they were supposed to and were able to come back and participate in sports, hall, dances and whatnot. … They don’t want seniors to come in and take full advantage of those without having something to give,” he said. “To sum it all up, they released this policy last year with still a lot to be worked out, but it was not a policy completely set in stone; they wanted to work with us about solutions going forward.”Other issues covered in the meeting between the council and the school administrators included the final deadline to decide upon this policy change and protests regarding the shift. There are plans in place for the sophomore class council to send out a survey to students about the exclusion policy.Senators had a variety questions and comments about the meeting and this potential survey to be sent out in the coming weeks. Senior Quentin Colo, off-campus senator, took concern over the description of the relationship between off-campus seniors and the dorm.“I know you’re not arguing for their policy — you’re just the liaison — but taking one-way relationships the way the University is describing it, it sounds like the relationship between off-campus students and on-campus students is parasitic; that we are somehow coming on campus and taking,” Colo said. “I think that language is incredibly harmful to anyone who is off-campus. I like to think that my off-campus friends [and I], we provide a lot to the on campus community.”Theriault clarified some of the sensitive issues with language coming from the administration.“It is all about language. We had a conversation with Heather Rackoczy Russell about community, and that is the heart of what this really stems from and trying to figure out what the administration views as community and what we view as community on campus; there seems to be a sort of rift between them,” he said, “Part of the policy is trying to form it into language that is both clear and also not degrading to off-campus [residents].”The sophomores said the University indicated it will allow seniors to partake in formal dorm events as long as they meaningfully participate in their dorm’s community. This idea of meaningfully participating in the dorm begot more concerns from senators, including junior D.C. Morris from Fisher Hall.“What is participation? Is it like going back to my study room in Fisher and helping other chemistry majors with class? Because that is not official participation,” Morris said. “The very presence of off-campus seniors advising, telling kids about life at Notre Dame — that’s not official. That isn’t like playing shoots and ladders with the RA or anything like that. The whole idea of participation, it seems they are trying to formalize that, like if you come back for certain events or raise money for the dorm and stuff like that. It’s more than that; it’s like the very presence of those seniors being there to tell kids what classes to take, what internships to do.”Luke Sheridan-Rabideau, sophomore senator from Keenan, pointed out a contradiction between building community and attendance at dorm events.“The events are kind of what builds community,” Sheridan-Rabideau said. “That’s where I’ve met pretty much everybody who is an off-campus senior, so I think having the requirement that you need to build community to go to the events is kind of counterproductive since the events are what build community.”Sophomore Samuel Delmer, the Dillon senator, pointed out that seniors contributed to the dorm for the three years prior to moving off-campus.“Seniors who have contributed to their dorm before, clearly they don’t stop — having contributed in the past — by virtue of being seniors; they’re not just seniors alive for that year. They’re human beings who have contributed to the dorm in the past,” Delmer said. “The administration really likes the dorm policy, and it’s something they pride themselves in. They may think it’s what makes Notre Dame special. I think we are ultimately what makes Notre Dame special, and I think our decisions as adults are what make Notre Dame special. Telling us where to live, where we can go and what communities we can join is kind of degrading.”Other points brought up in the meeting include trying to involve the Hall Presidents Council in the talks, hearing from members of the dorms at hall council meetings, involving freshmen and other ways of showing participation.In addition to the meeting today, the student senate passed a bill proposed last month requiring all individuals holding enumerated student government positions to complete GreeNDot training by January 1, 2020.Main concerns previously in discussion were whether to make the training recommended or mandatory, and the logistics of getting more than 100 officials certified. An amendment made the training mandatory, and Anne Jarrett, student government’s director of gender relations, addressed concerns about logistics at the meeting.“I had a meeting with the [Gender Relations Center] and basically found out that there are 20 plus GreeNDot trainings a semester usually,” Jarrett said. “The GRC was not concerned at all about making it super easy. They basically have GreeNDot training once a week, and then the way the checking would work is that either you have all positions sign a release that they are GreeNDot status whenever they take office, it can be released to president, vice-president or chief of staff, or we can do what the athletics department does because the athletics department requires the same kind of thing with GreeNDot training and that would mean that we print out the list of people who have positions. We hand the list to the GRC; the GRC says ‘yes’ and what date, gives the list to Karen Kennedy and from there she can make the list of who we need to contact. Super feasible, and the GRC is very excited about this.”At the recommendation of senior Tiffany Rojas, chair of the Diversity Council, the student senate may look into a similar bill for racial awareness.Tags: Notre Dame Student Senate, residential life, senior exclusion policylast_img read more

January 1, 2021 | |Post a Comment

first_imgThe Vermont Chamber of Commerce is please to announce the 2009 – 2010 Top Ten Winter Events Award recipients. The winners, in chronological order are:CRAFT VERMONT – Fine Craft, Art, and Design – presented by Vermont Hand CraftersSouth Burlington-Sheraton Hotel and Conference Center, November 19-22, 2009, Thurs. & Fri. 12-8 pm, Sat. 10-6 pm, Sun. 10-5 pm. At the CRAFT VERMONT – Fine Craft, Art, and Design Show you ll meet the artists and hear their stories, their inspiration, and their dedication to their craft. Shop over 130 booths of original, high quality, works in glass, ceramics, wood, and decorative fiber along with paintings, jewelry, photography, sculpture and wearable art made by Vermont s finest artisans. This highly acclaimed annual event offers a wide range of contemporary and traditional items in all price ranges. Four-day Pass $7 valid for unlimited re-entry. www.vermonthandcrafters.com;(link is external) 802-373-5429. Thanksgiving Weekend at Billings Farm & MuseumWoodstock, November 27-29, 2009, 10-3 pmView how Thanksgiving was celebrated over 100 years ago; the Thanksgiving meal is prepared in the 1890 Farm House wood burning stove. Traditional cooking demonstrations, horse drawn wagon rides, farm tours, and hands-on Thanksgiving activities and programs for every age. Adults $11, seniors $10, children ages 5-15 $6, ages 3-4 $3. www.billingsfarm.org;(link is external) 802-457-2355.The Lights of ChristmasSouth Royalton, November 27, 2009 – January 5, 2010Be captivated by over 120,000 lights and heart-warming displays honoring the birth of Jesus Christ at the Joseph Smith Birthplace Memorial Historic Site. Two-night lighting ceremonies. Enjoy The Lights of Christmas with live nativity, free refreshments, and continuous holiday music. NEW: Get in the spirit of Christmas with concerts by the Mormon Tabernacle Choir – America s Choir with renowned guest performers such as Angela Lansbury and Walter Cronkite on DVD in cozy 40 seat theater. It is one hour and is nondenominational.  Free. 802-783-7742.First Night BurlingtonBurlington, December 31, 2009, Noon to midnight.Vermont s largest single day arts festival, whose mission is to bring the community together with an accessible, substance-free New Year s Eve celebration of the arts. Over 20,000 people attend at 23 sites in downtown Burlington. $15 buttons ($20 day of event), $2 tickets. www.firstnightburlington.com;(link is external) 802-863-6005.Winter Dew TourMount Snow (West Dover), February 4-7, 2010, 9-6 pm.Over 20,000 spectators and another 1,000,000 television viewers witnessed hometown girl Kelly Clark s winning halfpipe run at the 2009 competition, while pros like Simon Dumont and Shaun White battled for the coveted Dew Cup. Festival Village features interactive displays, giveaways, athlete signings and live music. Party with the pros at the ALLI-After-Dark parties! Visit allisports.com or mountsnow.com for more information. Free. www.mountsnow.com;(link is external) 800-245-SNOW.Snowflake Festival 2010Lyndon and East Burke area events, February 12-28, 2010The Lyndon/Burke Snowflake Festival is two weeks of non-stop family fun in the Lyndon/Burke area celebrating the best of winter in the Northeast Kingdom. Many events take place at Lyndon Outing Club, the oldest volunteer-run ski area in Vermont. Burke Mountain is a spectacular setting for lots of family fun throughout the festival. Join us for pancake breakfasts, torchlight ski parades, free horse drawn wagon rides, cross-country and alpine skiing and much more! Most events are free. www.lyndonvermont.com;(link is external) 802-626-9696.Montshire Museum Igloo BuildNorwich, February 15, 2010, 10:30 am – 3 pmLearn how to build an insulated, sturdy house, strong enough to support the weight of a polar bear. Join Dr. Bert Yankielun, author of How to Build an Igloo and Other Snow Structures and learn the secrets of building with snow – from making the initial snow angel, to placing the final block on the dome, to sawing yourself out. Then try building your own igloo! Activities and presentations throughout the day. Free with Museum admission ($10 adults, $8 children 2-17, free for Montshire members and children under 2) www.montshire.org;(link is external) 802-649-2200.Middlebury Winter Carnival & Chili ContestMiddlebury, February 27, 2010, 2-5 pmThe Better Middlebury Partnership proudly presents the Middlebury Winter Carnival & Pro/Am Chili Contest! The streets of Middlebury will be alive with free chili, free live music and free treats for all! Last year 29 local restaurants served over 50 different kinds of chili! Amateurs and professionals are encouraged to enter – the public votes! Other activities include public skating, snowshoe races, an open house at the Middlebury Fire Station, dog sled demos, and a bonfire! Free. www.middbiz.org;(link is external) 802-388-4126.Burton U.S. Open Snowboarding ChampionshipsStratton Mountain, March 15-21, 2010The U.S. Open Snowboarding Championships have showcased the world s most progressive riding longer than any other snowboarding competition. For the 26th consecutive year, the competition will take place at Stratton Mountain Resort. Snowboarding s elite athletes like Shaun White, Danny Kass, Kelly Clark, and Hannah Teter are U.S. Open staples and compete in quarterpipe, halfpipe, and slopestyle events. The Open, which draws more than 20,000 fans, big name sponsors, snowboarding legends and international media, is free of charge to spectators. www.stratton.com;(link is external) 1-800-STRATTON.13th Green Mountain Film FestivalMontpelier, March 19-28, 2010Montpelier, in the heart of Vermont, provides the perfect setting for this intimate festival bringing together films and film makers from all over the world. Nearly 120 separate events over ten days, including interviews and discussions with film makers, writers, and other special guests from the world of film. Recent guests have included Oscar nominated screenwriter Robin Swicord (The Curious Case of Benjamin Button, and  Memoirs of a Geisha), and NPR and LA Times film critic Kenneth Turan. $7-$8.50, some events free. Discounts available. www.greenmountainfilmfestival.org;(link is external) 802-262-3423.Each year, a panel of independent judges chooses Vermont s best activities, selected for their diversity and wide appeal. This year s winners display a wide-range of family-friendly activities and represent many different parts of the state.In order to qualify as a Vermont Chamber of Commerce Top Ten Event, events must appeal to out-of-state visitors as well as Vermonters; appeal to a diverse audience, including children and families; and due to the additional attention a Top Ten garners, the event must be able to accommodate an influx of visitors up to twice the normal count.last_img read more

December 18, 2020 | |Post a Comment

first_imgWith massive student loan debt, a tough job market and stagnant wages, millennials face an uphill battle when it comes to getting ahead. But the 75 million young people between the ages of 18 and 34 should not lose hope.If you are a millennial, you can learn crucial information that will help pad your savings. Even in today’s challenging economy, millennials have the power to take control of the present and create a bright financial future.From investing in the right stocks to finding ways to increase your income, here are nine ways today’s millennials can become tomorrow’s financially secure generation.1. Invest in Mutual FundsJumping into the stock market might seem overwhelming, but there are easy and inexpensive ways to get started. Millennials can start investing in mutual funds, which offer better diversification than individual stocks, said Katharine Perry, an associate financial consultant at Fort Pitt Capital Group. continue reading » 24SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

December 17, 2020 | |Post a Comment

first_imgThere’s a terrific scene in the movie Office Space when lead character Peter Gibbons is avoiding Bill Lumbergh (history’s all-time worst-ever boss) to get out of working over the weekend. Peering over the wall of his cubicle, Peter makes a dash for the door only to be surprise-blocked by Lumbergh and stuck with the dreaded weekend assignment.If you know the movie, you really can’t blame Peter for trying to avoid his boss. For the most part, however work environments that are blighted with a culture of avoidance are not primed for success. Particularly in credit unions, we’re talking about those where, for whatever reason, staff avoids interaction with staff (what some call the silo mentality) and particularly when staff avoids contact with members.Avoid contact with members? That’s crazy, you might think. Interacting with our members is the most important thing credit unions do. It drives growth, profitability and deeper relationships. These things are all true — however, in the course of mystery shops during marketing audits for credit union partners, we are continually surprised at just how many financial institutions (and it’s not just banks, friends, credit unions are guilty of this, as well) still tolerate a culture of avoidance with consumers.Here’s a fairly typical scenario. During a marketing audit we visit a competitor (banks and credit unions) assigned to us by the credit union with which we are working. Typical culture avoidance signs we see often include:A passive entry/greeting system. Too many credit unions rely on passive methods of interacting with members and potential members as they enter branches. We still see clipboard sign-in sheets. Occasionally we will see a computer terminal sign-in queue system or maybe even a tablet. While technology may be better than a hard copy sign in, the method is still passive. In other words, you are relying on members (and potential members who may have never been in a given branch location) to announce their entry to you. In the experience economy in which credit unions now operate, exactly the opposite should occur. Instead of asking members to meekly announce their entry to you, your staff should trumpet an authentic branded greeting anytime someone walks in. Members gift us with their trust and business. The least we can do is actively greet them when they walk in the door. Nothing is worse than walking into a retailer (credit unions included) and feeling unnoticed. If your credit union has a culture of avoidance that tolerates a passive greeting system, your member experience is far from cutting edge.Employees that lack basic business communication skills. Avoidance here can mean things like little to no eye contact, no effort to learn a member/potential member names, reading from brochures instead of relying on internal product knowledge and paying more attention to their computer screen or even (gasp!) cell phone than the person in front of them. Yes, this happens during mystery shops. The lack of eye contact and no/poor use of member name is bad enough. You might be surprised, however, how many times we see credit union frontline staff with either enough lack of product knowledge or confidence in their ability to discuss it so that they rely on the cheat sheet of reading from a brochure. This does not inspire confidence in consumers when it comes to your credit union. And yes, we still see some credit union frontline staff either glancing at or actually typing at their computers and looking at their cell phones rather than fully engaging with the member/potential member directly across from them. That’s not just rude — it’s 100% detrimental to your member experience. If your credit union has a culture of avoidance that tolerates a lack of basic business communication skills, your member experience is floundering.A culture-wide silo mentality. When back-office departments don’t want to talk to member-facing frontline staff. And vice versa. When lending won’t talk to marketing. When marketing won’t talk to human resources. When IT won’t talk to anybody. This is silo mentality. Who does it end up ultimately harming the most? You probably guessed it – the member. Your entire staff must understand that for an optimal member experience, they must break out of the silo mentality and open communication between all people. Progressive credit union cultures that thrive in a brand-centric environment often begin to lose “department blinders” altogether, seeing one team of however many people work at your credit union all striving for the member experience instead of a litany of individual departments only loosely connected and often lost in worlds of their own. If your credit union has a culture of avoidance that tolerates the silo mentality, good luck trying to keep up with your more forward-thinking competitors.A culture of avoidance, whether internally amongst staff/departments, externally in front of members or both does not bode well for the future of your credit union. A more direct, welcoming and inclusive brand culture of working internally and with members is the direction upon which growing credit unions focus. As a member or potential member, ask yourself this question – “Would I rather work with a credit union where the staff obviously relishes the relationship working with me, or would I prefer to find another financial institution that does?” 4SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Mark Arnold Mark Arnold is an acclaimed speaker, brand expert and strategic planner helping businesses such as credit unions and banks achieve their goals with strategic marketing insights and energized training. Mark … Web: www.markarnold.com Detailslast_img read more

October 19, 2020 | |Post a Comment

first_imgRead also: Explainer: What’s the new coronavirus saliva test, and how does it work?Previously, Transportation Minister Budi Karya Sumadi said that he had asked the Finance Ministry to subsidize rapid tests for travelers, especially public transportation users.People seeking to travel by airplanes and long-distance trains are required to submit negative COVID-19 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) or rapid test results before being allowed to board.“We are currently asking the Finance Ministry to subsidize rapid tests for those who travel regularly,” he said earlier this month as quoted by kompas.com.Rapid tests, while faster, are less accurate than PCR tests, with a high possibility of false positives as well as false negatives.Topics : The Health Ministry has issued a circular setting a price ceiling of Rp 150,000 (US$10.41) for COVID-19 rapid tests, following numerous complaints over the high prices of such tests.The circular, dated Monday and signed by the ministry’s director-general for health services, Bambang Wibowo, states that all health facilities must adhere to the price ceiling.“The government needs to step in on the issue of rapid test prices so that the public do not feel like they are being taken advantage of for profit,” Bambang said in the circular.last_img read more

October 19, 2020 | |Post a Comment

first_imgOscar: a love of barbecue Oscar Farias was a joker, and an expert in the art of the “asado,” or grilling meat — an institution in Argentina.The 81-year-old former metal worker died alone in hospital in April, his family kept away by strict virus prevention protocols. “It was the most devastating and overwhelming thing,” says his daughter Monica, 45.She wasn’t even able to bring him a blanket when he called to say he was cold. They said their goodbyes on the phone.”When I told him we would go and eat a pizza and have some wine when he got better, we were really saying goodbye,” Monica says.She had to sign the authorization for his cremation without even seeing his coffin.She will keep in her mind an image of her father seen in a family photo — a happy man, grilling some meat, and listening to tango on the radio. Franklin’s coffee Victoria del Carmen says she still makes coffee every morning for her son Franklin Rivera, a Salvadoran photojournalist who was struck down by the virus at 52.When he was well, Rivera liked to use an exercise bike in his modest Ciudad Delgado house on the outskirts of the capital, San Salvador. Now, it sits unused. “No one can believe he is no longer with us,” says his sister Geraldina Juarez. “We can’t describe this emptiness.”To try to fill the void, his family are drawn to a box full of his old press credentials, eager to see his face once again.Rivera’s slow decline from the coronavirus began with a throat ailment on June 22 and then a urinary tract infection.When he was finally diagnosed with COVID-19, he self-isolated at home.Juarez remembers how tired he became, saying: “He could no longer walk much. He spent his days on his deck chair, which he set up in the yard.”He died after a lightning storm hit the city, unable to get a doctor with the emergency services at full stretch.In the yard, the blue deck chair is still there, in the shade of a tree — empty.Gravediggers wearing protective suits prepare to bury the coffin of Izolina de Sousa, 85, who died from the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), at Vila Formosa cemetery, Brazil’s biggest cemetery, in Sao Paulo, Brazil, May 26, 2020. (REUTERS/Amanda Perobelli)Paulo: a guitar and a sofa Paulo Roberto’s blue guitar still hangs on the wall in his house in the southeastern Brazilian city of Belo Horizonte. The small sofa where the 75-year-old liked to sit still bears his imprint.”He used to spend a lot of his time on this sofa in the living room to watch films, documentaries and take a nap,” said his wife Maria Candida Silveira.The pandemic has taken a tough toll on the family of Roberto, who died in June.Two of his four daughters contracted the virus, but only one lived to tell the tale. His 68-year-old wife fell gravely ill, but survived after a period in intensive care.Now Silveira finds it difficult to put his absence into words.”Sometimes you remember little details, moments we spent together, happy moments,” she said.”The memory of his music also remains, especially the old songs he loved to play and sing.”There is some consolation in knowing he was able to fulfill his dying wish: seeing his great-granddaughter Dudinha one more time. “I made a video call from my phone. He was sitting on the bed, laughing and playing with her over the phone. He managed to say goodbye to her,” she recalled. Hugo’s crucifix Hugo Lopez Camacho’s room stands as a monument to a humble life. A blanket decorated with a football motif covers his single bed. His pillowcase is embroidered with the phrase “I think of you.” A crucifix hangs on a brick wall. Lopez Camacho lived on the property of a primary school in a Mexico City neighborhood, where his father is the caretaker.He died in the same hospital where he had worked as an orderly for 14 years, wheeling patients to and from the surgical unit. He was 44.At first, it seemed like he had a bad cold or the flu. Lopez Camacho had headaches. Then he started having trouble breathing.He lost consciousness when he was hospitalized in late April. His mother never saw him again. He called when doctors said they would have to intubate him.”He knew what was going to happen,” his sister recalls.Mexico’s huge virus toll meant a backlog for funeral services, and the family had to wait for his remains to be handled.Aerial view of people attending a funeral at the Municipal Pantheon in Valle de Chalco, Mexico state, Mexico, on Thursday, amid the COVID-19 coronavirus pandemic. (AFP/PEDRO PARDO )They finally had to have him cremated, which was not their initial wish.And now they have to wait again, to be allowed to bury his ashes in the family crypt, along with those of his grandmother.center_img Topics : An untouched exercise bike, a guitar that has gone silent, an empty couch — these are just a few of the cherished possessions and everyday habits that tell the story of those who have died from COVID-19.The global pandemic has claimed nearly one million lives, about a third of those in Latin America, where countries with overstretched medical resources are bracing for a new wave.Across the region, AFP’s photographers met the families of several victims, who have been forced to contemplate the empty spaces their loved ones have left behind.last_img read more

October 18, 2020 | |Post a Comment

first_imgPalacios has confirmed Arsenal are interested in him (Picture: Getty)Arsenal are ready to listen to offers for the likes of Mesut Ozil and Shkodran Mustafi, as Emery targets an overhaul of his squad.But Arsenal’s efforts to lure big-name players to the Emirates is reportedly being hampered by their failure to qualify for the Champions League.A humiliating 4-1 defeat to Chelsea ended Arsenal’s hopes of securing Champions League football next season.More: FootballRio Ferdinand urges Ole Gunnar Solskjaer to drop Manchester United starChelsea defender Fikayo Tomori reveals why he made U-turn over transfer deadline day moveMikel Arteta rates Thomas Partey’s chances of making his Arsenal debut vs Man City Palacios almost move to Real Madrid last summer (Picture: Getty)River Plate midfielder Exequiel Palacios has confirmed Arsenal are interested in signing him this summer.The 20-year-old has been tracked by Arsenal and Real Madrid in the last year and is considered one of the brightest prospects in South America.Real agreed a £20million deal with River Plate for Palacios last summer, before injury scuppered the move and Arsenal have been tipped as the new frontrunners.Asked about his future this week, Palacios revealed Arsenal were one of his suitors: ‘I’m proud clubs like Real Madrid and Arsenal are interested in me.’ADVERTISEMENT Exequiel Palacios confirms Arsenal interested in summer transfer Palacios has an £18m release clause (Picture: Getty)Though Real agreed a £20m fee last year, Palacios’s release clause stands at a reported £18m.AdvertisementAdvertisementUnai Emery is planning a big summer, but will have to spend within his means due to a restricted transfer budget.The Spaniard reportedly has a transfer kitty as small as £45m and will have to offload some first-team players to raise further funds. Commentcenter_img Coral BarryWednesday 5 Jun 2019 11:45 pmShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link467Shares Advertisement Advertisementlast_img read more