April 21, 2021 | |Post a Comment

first_imgInter Link revealed that it achieved 99.9% service level for key customer Tesco last week as a recovery gets underway.The cake supplier, which has £60m in debts, also saw above budget sales in May, chairman Jeremy Hamer told British Baker.He added that information had now been passed to potential bidder and rival cake company McCambridge, and he expected McCambridge to make an offer for the company.Shares in Inter Link Foods, which were trading at over £7 last year, tumbled to a low of 76p in March after a string of profit warnings. Inter Link currently has a market capitalisation of around £10.8m and McCambridge has built up around a 10% stake. McCambridge has been buying up shares in Inter Link at £1 a share.last_img read more

April 21, 2021 | |Post a Comment

first_imgAsda has cut artificial colours and flavours from all of its 9,000 own-label products.Asda’s bakery director Huw Edwards told British Baker that the initiative applies to all own-label bakery products including celebration cakes, in-store bakery lines and morning goods as of this month. He said that on-pack information would be used to communicate the ’free-from’ message to consumers.”We have been working with bakery suppliers for the last 12 months,” Joanne Elsdon, category products manager for bakery told British Baker. “We are delighted to be the first UK food retailer to deliver this pledge.”She added that its bakery products would now meet the Food Standards Agency’s guidelines regarding recommended salt levels.The removal of artificial colours and flavours includes E numbers and hydrogenated vegetable oil, Asda said.The initiative comes after the launch of a Tesco range of breads in August, made without emulsifiers, flavourings or preservatives.”Our bakery section performed very well over the Christmas period,” Huw Edwards added, “with more people buying the Extra Special premium ranges than ever before.” Asda’s Extra Special bakery had its best Christmas ever, with sales doubling year-on-year, he said.Asda revealed in a statement that sales on Christmas Eve were one-third higher than the biggest previous Christmas Eve in 2004.last_img read more

April 21, 2021 | |Post a Comment

first_imgThe Jacob Fruitfield Food Group has set out plans to restructure its manufacturing operations, which will lead to the closure of its biscuit factory near Dublin with the loss of 220 jobs.Company chairman Michael Carey regretted the redundancies but said they were unavoidable because the factory at Tallaght had become “extremely uncompetitive with outdated manufacturing equipment”.He said: “It was built in the 1970s and has been operating for many years at just 16% of its full capacity.”Peadar Nolan, assistant branch organiser of the Services, Industrial, Professional and Technical Union (SIPTU), said it was seeking an urgent meeting with the company to “explore the possibility of retaining the manufacturing jobs in Ireland”. It also wants to meet Enterprise Minister Michael Martin to express its concern over the planned closure.Jacob Fruitfield said its sales, marketing and administration would still be located in Tallaght but manufacturing would be transferred to other facilities in Ireland, the UK and Europe.Jacob’s Wafers will continue to be produced at Gweedore in County Donegal, with premium biscuits made in Cork where investment is planned.last_img read more

April 21, 2021 | |Post a Comment

first_imgJames Gibson of cake decorations company Sweet Sensations knows he is swimming against the tide as he speaks up in defence of synthetic food colours in icing sugar and marzipan.The Food Standards Agency (FSA) has imposed a voluntary ban on six synthetic E-number food colours from the end of 2009, and retailers have already demanded suppliers clean up labels. Europe is also set to impose labelling regulations on the forbidden colours from 2010.But the ’synthetic versus natural’ debate is far from black and white, according to Gibson. As he argues: “In cake decoration you want the product to look good enough to eat. These new natural colours are dull and boring. I can understand why you would want to limit consumption in everyday use, but in cake decoration, you only have one birthday cake and it should look attractive.”There’s a lot more to the case he is making than appearance, he adds. He takes the example of annatto, a reddish-orange dye made from the seed of the achiote, which is being used as a natural alternative yellow dye. “In 10kg of marzipan I would use 5g of synthetic colour and, actually, only 12% of that would be colour. With the natural colour I have to use 120g,” he says.On top of that, are the natural colours actually proven to be better? Gibson’s own daughter is allergic to annatto, he explains, suffering from fever if she accidentally consumes it.The Food and Drink Federation’s (FDF) Biscuit, Cake, Chocolate and Confectionery (BCCC) sector manager Barbara Gallani is also unconvinced by the relative benefits of natural colours: “In terms of shelf-life, stability, and with regard to the cost of natural colours, there are a number of issues that manufacturers need to address,” she says. However, consumer demand for clean-label makes this a particularly sensitive issue to tackle, she says. The FDF continues to engage with the FSA on it, she adds.Colours crackdownThe crackdown on artificial colours follows a Southampton University study, commissioned by the FSA in 2007. The study, Chronic and acute effects of artificial colourings and preservatives on children’s behaviour, was published in The Lancet.It looked at consumption of the preservative sodium benzoate (E211), and artificial colours; tartrazine (E102), ponceau 4R (E124), sunset yellow (E110), carmoisine (E122), quinoline yellow (E104) and allura red AC (E129).It considered the effect of mixes of these additives on a range of children aged between three and nine, drawn from the general population and across a range of hyperactivity and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder severities.The researchers concluded that artificial food colours and additives exacerbate hyperactive behaviour in children – at least up to middle childhood.At its board meeting in April 2008, the FSA agreed that the UK food industry should be encouraged to remove the colours voluntarily by 2009. And it shared the Southampton research findings with the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA), which was conducting a review of the safety of all food colours approved for use in the European Union, at the request of the European Commission.In March 2008, EFSA issued its opinion on the Southampton study, saying that the study could not be used as a basis for altering the Acceptable Daily Intakes of the additives in question.As the situation stands, from the end of 2010, products made using the six Southampton colours (see image) will have to carry a warning: “May have an adverse effect on activity and attention in children.” Details of how this will work have yet to be finalised. And it would appear the jury is still very much out on whether it is a good idea. Dreary-looking celebration cakes are bound to be a less-than-welcome result for the bakery sector.—-=== Some natural food dyes ===l Caramel colouring – made from caramelised sugar, used in cola products and also in cosmeticsl Annatto – a reddish-orange dye made from the seed of the achiotel A green dye made from chlorella algael Cochineal – a red dye derived from the cochineal insect, Dactylopius Coccusl Betanin – extracted from beetsl Turmericl Saffronl Paprikal Elderberry juice—-=== Why ban artificial colours? ===The FSA’s arguments for banning the ’Southampton Six’ food colours:l the Southampton study is “a scientific study of the highest quality”l there is an accumulating body of evidence that there is an association between the consumption of certain food colours and children’s behaviourl all food additives must be safe for use in order to be approved. The available evidence now leaves uncertainty as to whether that safety can be confidently assertedl the technological function of colours in food is about conferring a consumer choice benefit rather than a safety benefitl a significant part of the UK food industry is already moving away from the use of artificial food colours in responding to consumer demand.And the Food and Drink Federation’s position:”For a number of years, the UK industry has been responding to consumers’ demands for fewer artificial additives in food and drinks. Our members have been reducing the use of the colours highlighted in the Southampton study. The overwhelming majority of products don’t contain these particular colours. However, there are a handful of popular food and drinks where reformulation has not been possible for technical reasons and we are concerned these will have to be taken off shop shelves in light of the FSA proposal.”last_img read more

April 21, 2021 | |Post a Comment

first_imgBy Max Jenvey of Oxxygen Marketing Partnership, a strategic management agency that works on brand development within the bakery, foodservice and convenience retail sectors.Are you looking to improve your bakery offer by adding new products that meet today’s trends? Good idea, as there is a lot going on in the baking industry for example, the recent rise of gluten-free products, favoured by customers with dietary concerns. While the ’low-carb’ bakery category has experienced a slight downturn in demand, gluten-free products are growing. The gluten-free bread market, for example, rose from around £8m at its launch to about £13m today and is expected to be worth £19m-£20m by this time next year (British Baker, 2010).This growth is, first and foremost, due to an increase in people diagnosed with gluten intolerance and coeliac disease. However, those interested in a healthier lifestyle are also showing interest in gluten-free products. Research firm him! says 31% of bakery product customers would appreciate information about the product’s content and nutritional values.If this approach is too specialised for your offer and customers, no problem just try different fillings and toppings for your sweet and savoury products. Why not surprise your customers with a ham and cheese croissant, focusing on the provenance of your ingredients French cheese, Italian hams and sausages, for example. Hold your savouries hot for your customers on the move. Play on British heritage and introduce English thick-cut marmalade muffins or try out a US-inspired product, such as a rich pecan pie. Merchandise your range in handy individual-size portions people are easily tempted by a smaller slice than a whole cake!Your customers will definitely appreciate your extended and diversified offer. Thirty per cent of bakery products customers buy their products in bakeries, cafés, and convenience stores, because they are looking for a snack in-between meals, according to him! (Coffee Shop Report 2009) and, as nobody wants the same snack every day, customers will be delighted to try out something new.Him! also says 88% of bakery customers do not have a specific budget in mind when they hunt for a snack, so you can even charge a little premium on your special offers.last_img read more

April 21, 2021 | |Post a Comment

first_imgThe food industry needs to change more radically in the coming decades than ever before, if it is to address the unprecedented challenges that lie ahead, warns a new government report.The Future of Food and Farming: Challenges and Choices for Global Sustainability said relatively little new land for agriculture means more food needs to be produced by simultaneously raising yields, increasing the efficiency with which inputs are used and reducing the negative environmental effects of food production. It warned of growing pressure on water supplies and says incentives to encourage greater efficiency of water use and the development of integrated water management plans need to be given high priority.Food waste was also highlighted as a priority an area where individual citizens and businesses, particularly in high-income countries, can make a clear contribution, said the report. And it called on everyone to play a part: UN and other international organisations, governments, the private sector, non-governmental organisations, the research community and individual consumers.It concluded: “There is the risk of negative irreversible events if action is not taken; this includes the loss of biodiversity, the collapse of fisheries and the loss of some ecosystem services, for example the destruction of soils.”last_img read more

April 21, 2021 | |Post a Comment

first_imgEntries are now being accepted for Product of the Year 2012. Now in its eighth year, it is the nation’s largest independent survey, conducted by TNS Research International, into FMCG product innovation, with over 12,000 consumers voting.According to new research by Kantar Worldpanel, the inclusion of a Product of the Year logo on 14 winning products from 2009, achieved an average of £9.2m in sales in the 12-month time period, against an average new product, which achieves less than £1m after one year of its launch.  Winners of this prestigious award typically see a 10-15% increase in sales, according to the organisers.The awards are free to enter for any product or product line launched within the past 18 months. Entries received before 1 July will receive a 15% early bird discount if the product passes the Jury Day test and is submitted to the research stage to be voted Product of the Year 2012. Winners for 2011, announced in January, included Warburtons for its SnackaDoodle in the Snacks category, and Aunt Bessie’s Perfect for Chicken Yorkshire Puddings in the Savoury Food categoryTo enter your product or to find out more visit www.productoftheyear.co.uk. The final deadline is 6 August, 2011.last_img read more

April 21, 2021 | |Post a Comment

first_imgThe Food and Drink Federation (FDF) is continuing to reduce accident numbers in food manufacturing, but must focus on occupational ill health within the bakery sector.Partnering with the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) and trade union groups, the FDF has launched the third edition of its Common Strategy, a five-year programme focusing on reducing occupational ill health levels and improving workplace wellbeing. It comes as overall injury rates in food and drink manufacturing, which is categorised as over three-day absence and major injuries combined, has reduced from 2,805 injuries/100,000 workers in 1990 to 1,404 in 2010, a reduction of 50%. However, cases of occupationally induced asthma remained above average, mainly due to exposure in small or medium-sized bakeries and other premises handling flour and associated ingredients. According to the HSE, flour dust and enzymes containing additives, such as amylase, are the second most common cause of occupational asthma, which can also cause dermatitis, and can affect workers in bakeries, flour mills and kitchens.Emily Humphreys, head of policy and public affairs at Asthma UK, said: ‘We know that occupational asthma is the most frequently reported work-related respiratory disease in the UK, so we’re glad to see a long-term strategy being introduced to address this. Over 12.7 million working days are lost to asthma each year and we estimate the annual cost of asthma to society is £2.3bn. “Asthma UK’s Workplace Charter sets out 10 recommendations to reduce the impact of asthma in the workplace, and provides information on asthma triggers and symptoms, instructions on what to do if someone is having an attack, and guidelines for employers on making the work environment an asthma-friendly zone.”Richard Morgan, head of HSE’s food and drink manufacture section, said: “While larger bakeries have largely managed to control flour and ingredient dust there are still health problems associated with exposure to dust at many small and medium sized bakeries. Fortunately there is plenty of user-friendly guidance freely available for these bakeries and I would encourage businesses to look at this and take any action necessary to protect their workers.”Future aims highlighted in the report were to reduce reportable and major injury rates, decrease fatal injuries to zero each year, further reduce occupational ill health, particularly upper limb disorders and back injuries, which comprise almost 60% of the ill health, and continue to promote, develop and implement management issues.Achievements of these aims, set out in the Common Strategy, will be monitored until at least 2020, with a review every five years.last_img read more

April 21, 2021 | |Post a Comment

first_imgWaitrose is to launch a new British-inspired food-to-go range in April.Forming part of its Good to Go range, it will feature sandwiches, snack and desserts, in packaging decorated with bunting and flags.The sandwich range includes: Oak Smoked Cheddar and Apple, Scottish Smoked Salmon and Egg, Coronation Chicken, and British Roast Chicken, Ham Hock and Creamy Leeks.Waitrose will also be launching a British Corned Beef and Tangy Pickle Waitrose, which it said is the first sandwich from a UK supermarket that uses British corned beef.Other products include: Orkney Dressed Crab with Brown Toasts, Elderflower Jelly with Fresh Berries and a British Jubilee Strawberry SmoothieProducts will launch in Waitrose stores on 11 April.last_img read more

April 20, 2021 | |Post a Comment

first_img Twitter By Jon Zimney – March 30, 2020 0 342 (Photo supplied/Walmart) Police in Goshen were called to the Walmart store on Elkhart Road on a report that a 16-year-old boy was going around coughing and saying he had coronavirus, alarming customers.It happened early Friday afternoon, March 27.Walmart requested the juvenile be banned.The trespass statute was explained to the teen and his parents. Facebook WhatsApp Google+ Facebook WhatsApp Boy, 16, banned from Walmart in Goshen after coughing, claiming he had coronavirus Pinterest Twitter Google+ CoronavirusIndianaLocalNews Pinterest Previous articleVirus separating Indiana’s governor, lieutenant governorNext articleTrump extends voluntary national shutdown, braces US for big death toll Jon ZimneyJon Zimney is the News and Programming Director for News/Talk 95.3 Michiana’s News Channel and host of the Fries With That podcast. Follow him on Twitter @jzimney.last_img read more