June 23, 2021 | |Post a Comment

first_imgWales’ left wing Shane Williams applauds after the 2011 Rugby World Cup pool D match Wales vs Samoa at Waikato Stadium in Hamilton on September 18, 2011. AFP PHOTO / GABRIEL BOUYS (Photo credit should read GABRIEL BOUYS/AFP/Getty Images) Recovering going to plan for WilliamsShane Williams could be in contention for selection for the Rugby World Cup Round 4 Pool D clash with Fiji at the Waikato Stadium on Sunday and fellow injury victims Dan Lydiate and James Hook remain on course to return should Wales progress to the quarter-final stage of the New Zealand-based tournament.The Ospreys wing and all-time record try scorer for his country, who missed his side’s comprehensive 81 – 7 victory over Namibia in New Plymouth on Monday night with a thigh strain, is at the running stage of his rehabilitation.“Shane is recovering well,” said WRU national medical performance manager Prav Mathema. “He is back up and running and we are pleased with his progress, but the next 48 hours will be essential in determining whether he may be available to us this weekend.”Dragons back row forward Lydiate, who injured his ankle during Wales’ second round 17 – 10 win over Samoa, remains on target to return in the next fortnight. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS “James has also been extremely thorough with his rehabilitation and is recovering well from the A/C joint injury to his shoulder,” added Mathema. “We are hoping to integrate him into full training towards the start of next week.”Elsewhere, the Wales squad picked up no new significant injury problems last weekend. “Dan is now back running again after suffering an ankle ligament strain in the Samoa game,” added Mathema. “He has been incredibly diligent with his rehab and his self management and as a consequence has given himself every opportunity to be available for selection within the next two weeks. He still has a number of stages to complete within his rehabilitation but we are confident that he will continue to make a swift recovery.”Hook also injured his shoulder in the Samoa match ruling him out of last weekend’s outing in New Plymouth and the Perpignan-bound utility back is progressing at a similar rate to Lydiate.last_img read more

June 23, 2021 | |Post a Comment

first_img Scott Williams starts at centre, replacing Jamie RobertsWALES HAVE named a side to play Australia in Brisbane this weekend showing four changes from that which sealed a 16-9 victory over France last March to be crowned Champions of Europe and achieve their third Grand Slam in seven seasons.In the front row Scarlets hooker Ken Owens replaces Matthew Rees and it’s all change in the second row with Bradley Davies (Blues) and Luke Charteris (Dragons) replacing Ian Evans – who joins the tour party immediately after his wedding this weekend – and Alun Wyn Jones (Ospreys), who moves to the bench.There is one change to the backline which remained together for the duration of the 2012 Six Nations clean sweep, with Scarlets centre Scott Williams replacing the injured Jamie Roberts (knee).That means 15 of the players who travelled to Brisbane early last week, and missed Wales’ 30-21 victory over the Barbarians at the Millennium Stadium on Saturday, have been handed starting positions with the 16th, uncapped Ospreys centre Ashley Beck, providing cover from the bench.The rest of the replacements bench is made up of starters from the Baa-Baas victory, each of whom were involved in the match day 22 on Grand Slam day.Scarlets hooker Rees joins prop Paul James, lock Jones and back row Ryan Jones (all Ospreys) to provide cover for the forwards with Blues scrum-half Lloyd Williams and Perpignan pivot James Hook complete the line-up.“We are well prepared and looking forward to the challenge this weekend,” said Wales caretaker head coach Rob Howley. CARDIFF, WALES – DECEMBER 03: Scott Williams of Wales in action during the Test match between Wales and the Australian Wallabies at Millennium Stadium on December 3, 2011 in Cardiff, Wales. (Photo by Matthew Lewis/Getty Images) LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS “Australia will be disappointed after their defeat to Scotland, but that will make them all the more dangerous for us.“The Wallabies are still the second highest placed side in the world rankings and we are playing them in their own back yard.“We all appreciate the enormity of the task ahead of us, the long term stats don’t make happy reading for the Welsh against the Wallabies, but as recently as this season we have two losses racked up against Australian opposition and we are determined to stop that trend.“We have created some winning momentum, we have a recent home win against the Barbarians to take into this game and have built a certain amount of confidence within the squad.”Australia v WalesSaturday, 9th June 2012 at Suncorp Stadium, BrisbaneKick-off: 11:00 BST Starting XV:Leigh Halfpenny, Alex Cuthbert, Jonathan Davies, Scott Williams, George North; Rhys Priestland, Mike Phillips; Gethin Jenkins, Ken Owens, Adam Jones, Bradley Davies, Luke Charteris, Dan Lydiate, Sam Warburton (Captain), Toby FaletauReplacements:Matthew Rees, Paul James, Alun Wyn Jones, Ryan Jones, Lloyd Williams, James Hook, Ashley Becklast_img read more

June 23, 2021 | |Post a Comment

first_imgFoam roll glute (left): sit on roll. Place ankle on opposite kneeGently roll over each glute muscle groupFoam roll calf (right): sit down on floor and place roll under calf. Rest other foot on top of the otherRoll from back of knee to Achilles tendonThis article appeared in the November 2012 issue of Rugby World Magazine.Find a newsagent that sells Rugby World in the UK. Or you may prefer the digital edition on your MAC, PC, or iPad. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS WITH WINTER approaching and the temptation for comfort food rising, it’s important to keep tabs on your body fat, writes Harlequins’ head of strength and conditioning John Dams. If you’re struggling for motivation, find a training partner to help.Warm-upTwo new mobility drills: one a variation of a hurdle drill and the other a great one to help the range of motion in your hips.Hurdle walkovers (left): put hands on head facing hurdles. Keep chest up and hips square. Step over hurdles, alternating lead legSquat to stand (right): place your hands under your toes and pull yourself into a squat positionFrom squat, straighten your legs whilst keeping hands in placeKey movementPerform these exercises back-to-back with no rest – a superset. It’s a great way to add a conditioning element to a strength session.Dumb-bell bench press (left): weights shoulder-width apartLower the dumb-bells to just below your shoulders whilst keeping your lower arms parallelChest-supported dumb-bell row (right): keep chest on benchPull dumb-bells to side of bench. Lead with elbows and pullConditioning toolThese next two training exercises are both high-intensity conditioning ideas to help reduce body fat.center_img Battle ropes (left): hold ropes in each hand. Move them up and down as hard as you can, each arm doing opposite of the otherWork on a 1:1 work:rest ratio, working no longer than 60secsProwler push (right): use a robust sled and keep lowPush hard and work to a 1:1 work:rest ratioRecovery toolThese are two recovery tools after an intense workout. Foam rolling aids muscle recovery and function.last_img read more

June 23, 2021 | |Post a Comment

first_imgCountdown is on: Owen Farrell leads the attack in training as England prepare for their title showdown with WalesTHIS WEEK’S behind-the-scenes video from the England camp sees Toby Flood and James Haskell analyse what will be key areas of their Six Nations title showdown with Wales on Saturday, Freddie Burns and Billy Twelvetrees share some banter and Mike Catt gives an insight into his coaching philosophy. Watch the video below… LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img

June 23, 2021 | |Post a Comment

first_imgHere’s a gamut of international stars, including Manu Tuilagi, Sean O’Brien, Richie Gray and Adam Jones say a few words about the great man. It’s well worth a look… Farewell to all: Brian O’Driscoll will take his final bow for Ireland against FranceBRIAN O’DRISCOLL  will depart the international scene for after 15 years and 141 Test caps after tomorrow’s game against France, with Irish fans hoping it can be with a Six Nations championship as a fitting send-off. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

June 23, 2021 | |Post a Comment

first_img Munster Player of the Season Keith EarlsFollowing the news that Keith Earls has been voted Munster’s Player of the Year, we felt it was fitting to share this Rugby World magazine ‘Club Hero’ article from earlier in the year that pays tribute to the Ireland wing…It’s ten years since Doug Howlett arrived at Munster and was given a heads-up about a new team-mate. “My New Zealand colleagues, Rua Tipoki and Lifeimi Mafi, were here at the time and told me, ‘Look out for this kid, Keith Earls. He’s got it.’ It didn’t take long to see that this guy was a talented individual.”As New Zealand’s record try-scorer and not long out of a 62-cap Test career, Howlett made an ideal mentor to his fellow winger, who was then 20 and a few months away from making his Ireland debut.“Earlsy was a fast learner, that was what first attracted me to him,” adds Howlett, who now manages Munster’s commercial arm. “He was like a sponge and took everything on. You can pass on knowledge but when people take it, digest it and make it their own, that’s a skill. And he has that.”Early days: Keith Earls during Munster’s 2008 Heineken Cup campaign (Getty Images)Things happened fast for Earls. He was on the bench when Munster won the 2008 Heineken Cup and scored with his first touch in Test rugby, against Canada that November. That match was played at Thomond Park, a fitting stage for a player whose surname was already revered in Limerick because of his father.Ger Earls was a carpet-layer and tough-as-nails openside who scored the winning try on Young Munster’s greatest day – their 1993 All-Ireland League triumph. Paul O’Connell overlapped with Ger at Young Munster and he admits in his book that it took a long time to get used to the fact he was in the same team as one of his heroes.Fifteen years after playing alongside Ger, O’Connell suffered an injury that ended his World Cup (and ultimately his career) and he found a certain solace in the fact that the roomie looking after him in camp – helping him to dress, fetching his food – was Keith.So the baton keeps passing on. From his first days at Thomond RFC’s U8s, Earls has now scored more World Cup tries (eight) than any other Irishman, the fourth most for his country (26) and the most for Ireland in a season (nine, in 2016-17).Pure delight: Keith Earls celebrates Ireland’s Grand Slam this year (Getty Images)If he richly deserves his reputation as a game-turner, he has also incurred more than his share of injuries, hence why a century of caps remains some way off for the now 30-year-old. At 85.91kg (Munster’s website is remarkably precise), Earls is a relative lightweight and arguably more vulnerable to the rigours of the pro game. Howlett, though, wouldn’t have it any other way.“What I love about Keith is that in a modern-day game of giants, where it’s all about size and how much you can lift, he makes a place for players of speed, skill, guile, and with a game sense.“He can sniff out opportunities at any instant. This guy is as powerful as anybody but he’s proved that you don’t have to be a giant to play our game.”“What I love about Keith is that in a modern-day game of giants, he makes a place for players of speed, skill and guile” Doug HowlettThe All Black recalls having to be on his guard in training. “He could make people look silly at the drop of a hat: in terms of beating you, sidestepping you, making you fall over trying to tackle him.“And I always remember a lovely touch at Independent Park. The ball was on the ground and he flicked it up in full flight, GAA style, and it popped into his hands and he scored. What a touch. He does that in training all the time; it’s great to see a guy play with that confidence.”Such belief instils confidence in others, helping the team to be more than the sum of its parts. And at the root of it all is a desire to perform for his province. Keith Earls has been named Munster Player of the Year for the 2017-18 season – we hail a decade of delicious trickery by the Ireland wing Red alert: Keith Earls on the attack for Munster against Racing 92 (Getty Images) “There’s meaning when Keith takes the field, a deep-rooted understanding of why he’s playing, what his history is, who he’s playing for. That makes him give 100% every time he takes the pitch. That’s what you get from him.”This article originally appeared in the March 2018 edition of Rugby World magazine. Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. TAGS: Munster LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

June 23, 2021 | |Post a Comment

first_img European Champions Cup final likened to Test matchAfter Saracens had beaten Leinster 20-10 to win this year’s European Champions Cup, players described the match as “Test-match quality”.It was a hugely physical match at St James’ Park in Newcastle and Saracens’ dominance of the tight exchanges drew comparison with England’s Six Nations win over Ireland in Dublin.“They’re two extremely physical games,” said Saracens fly-half Owen Farrell. “They were probably played in a different way but the main comparison I’d say is you definitely feel it after the game. You know you’ve been in a tough game and this was a Test match-like game.”Closed down: Brad Barritt is tackled by Johnny Sexton and Sean O’Brien (Getty Images)There were more than 400 tackles made in the game, Man of the Match Brad Barritt topping the charts with 28 and his Saracens team-mate George Kruis not far behind on 27. Even Maro Itoje, who spent ten minutes in the sin-bin, put in 23 tackles.It was that defensive effort that limited Leinster to just two line breaks. And it wasn’t just the big men who defended so resolutely. When Leinster were attacking early in the second half, Liam Williams rushed out of the defensive line to close down Garry Ringrose and win a turnover. That moment was one of many that demonstrated the intensity of both teams. The Leinster contingent agreed with the assessment of the match as international quality. Saracens and Leinster players compare physicality in Newcastle to international rugby Saracens already have this trophy in their cabinet but there is more silverware up for grabs this season for both the English side and Leinster in terms of the Gallagher Premiership and Guinness Pro12 respectively.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. “It was ferocious Test-match stuff,” said Leinster fly-half Johnny Sexton. “We knew it would be. And one thing I’d say is I’m unbelievably proud. We never took a backward step. There were times we weren’t missing any tackles but they’d make half a yard.“They’re very good at what they do and try to steamroller you and at times they did that very well.”Related: Saracens beat Leinster to be crowned European championsLeo Cullen pointed to the sheer size of the Saracens team and the inevitable impact that makes in a rugby match.Leinster’s director of rugby said: “They’re big, big men. Standing down in the tunnel, you see the size of Billy Vunipola, Maro Itoje and Will Skelton in particular. We don’t have access to many of that type of player and they wore us down for sure.“They squeezed the life out of us at times. They’re very comfortable defending and putting the squeeze on teams. They did that really well and strangled us in the last 20 minutes.”Impact sub: Vincent Koch makes a break against Leinster (Getty Images)As well as hailing Barritt’s influence in defence, Saracens director of rugby Mark McCall paid tribute to replacement props Richard Barrington and Vincent Koch. The pair came on for the injured Mako Vunipola and Titi Lamositele after half an hour and impressed at the scrummage while Koch was a rampaging force in the loose.McCall said: “Richard Barrington was superb and is a really important player for the club, on the field and off the field. The way he played was fantastic and Vincent Koch produced his best game of the season.”center_img LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS TAGS: LeinsterSaracens Euro stars: Will Skelton leads Saracens’ celebrations (Getty Images) last_img read more

June 23, 2021 | |Post a Comment

first_imgMeanwhile, Worcester Warriors welcomed Premiership Rugby’s decision to cancel tonight’s match. “This is the right outcome for the safety of all players, staff and officials involved,” said a club statement, “although we do have sympathy for Sale that such an important match has been decided in this way.“Sadly, we are playing rugby in the middle of a pandemic and in unprecedented circumstances. While it is desirable to retain the integrity of all competitions as much as possible, ultimately the health and safety of all involved has to be the absolute priority.”Gallagher Premiership semi-finals on Saturday 10 October:1.30pm: Wasps v Bristol Bears4.30pm: Exeter Chiefs v Bath TAGS: Sale Sharks “Covid-19 has created the biggest challenges rugby has ever faced, as it threatens the future of the game. But with this case resolved, it is crucial we now look forward to two compelling semi-finals on Saturday, which are followed by two of our clubs contesting European finals the weekend after and our season ending on a high at Twickenham on 24 October.”Related content: World Rugby’s medical chief on coping with CovidAs required under the Professional Game Board’s Minimum Operating Standards, Sale will now complete their contact tracing and will isolate any contacts (of those players who tested positive) for a period of 14 days. An independent audit, by the RFU, of the track and trace processes at the club is also being undertaken. Dejected: Sale players after last month’s defeat by Bath, who have pipped them to a play-off place (Getty) New confirmed cases of coronavirus at Sale Sharks mean they have forfeited tonight’s game with Worcester, leaving Bath to complete the Premiership semi-final line-up Sale v Worcester cancelled, Bath in play-offsTonight’s Gallagher Premiership match between Sale and Worcester has been cancelled. Worcester have been awarded a 20-0 win and five league points.The decision comes after a new round of testing for Covid-19 revealed that an additional six players and two staff had returned positive tests. All were immediately placed into isolation for ten days. It means there have been 27 positive tests at Sale Sharks in the last seven days, compared to 68 positives across the entire league during the previous 12 weeks.Sale has been well placed to claim the remaining Premiership play-off spot, with a straightforward win sufficient to qualify for their first semi-final since 2006. But Bath have now secured that place and will face Exeter Chiefs at Sandy Park in the second semi-final on Saturday. Wasps v Bristol at the Ricoh Arena is the other semi.Sale’s match with Worcester was meant to have taken place last Sunday, but was postponed in the wake of an explosion of Covid cases among the squad.Related content: Sale and Northampton games affected by CovidReprieve: Bath’s draw at Saracens on Sunday had looked like costing them a semi-final place (Getty)Premiership Rugby chief executive Darren Childs said: “I have spoken to Sale Sharks this morning and neither the club nor Premiership Rugby will take risks with people’s health.“Together we won’t compromise our commitment that matches will only happen if it is safe to do so, therefore the game is off. Today’s decision demonstrates that commitment.“Our first thoughts are now with those at the club, both players and management, who have tested positive and we wish them a speedy recovery. We mustn’t forget we have a significant number of people at one of our clubs with Covid-19, and we will give the Sharks all the support they need.“We know everyone at Sale Sharks will be devastated, and we share their disappointment that their season ends this way. But we can’t jeopardise the health of any players, staff or management at any of our clubs.“We stated there was no room in the calendar for matches to be postponed but last weekend the health of everyone involved took precedent to ensure the Sale Sharks squad could be tested again, following the initial positive tests. Those concerns were proved today when we saw an additional eight positive tests.“People fight hard for points in Gallagher Premiership rugby, and for a place in the semi-final, but everyone agrees this has to take second place to people’s health and wellbeing. Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.last_img read more

June 20, 2021 | |Post a Comment

first_imgAnglican Consultative Council Digest: Oct. 30 Anglican Consultative Council, Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Martinsville, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Hopkinsville, KY Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Washington, DC Comments are closed. Featured Events Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Knoxville, TN Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Belleville, IL Rector Albany, NY Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Tags Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Submit a Job Listing Press Release Service Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT [Episcopal News Service – Auckland, New Zealand] Much happens each day during the Anglican Consultative Council‘s (ACC) 15th meeting. In addition to Episcopal News Service’s regular coverage, here’s some of what else went on Oct. 30 (local time), the fourth day of the Oct. 27-Nov. 7 gathering.Members get covenant status updateWhile the ACC is not due to discuss the current status of the Anglican Covenant until Oct. 31, a document handed out today shows that nine provinces have made a final decision on the covenant with one rejecting the covenant, six accepting it as is and two making modifications as part of their acceptance.Those in the so-called Category A that have approved the convent are Ireland, Mexico, Myanmar, Papua New Guinea, Southern Cone of America, and the West Indies. In addition, according to the document, South East Asia adopted the covenant with an added preamble of its own and the Anglican Church in Aotearoa, New Zealand and Polynesia has subscribed to the covenant’s first three sections but said it cannot adopt section 4, which outlines a process for resolving disputes.And, also in Category A, is the Scottish Episcopal Church, which has refused to adopt the covenant.The U.S.-based Episcopal Church is one of eight provinces sorted into Category B, which is described as including provinces that have made “partial decisions” about the covenant.At the General Convention in July, the Episcopal Church, via Resolution B005, “declined to take a position” on the covenant. Convention also passed Resolution D008, which pledged that the Episcopal Church would “maintain and reinforce strong links across the world-wide Anglican Communion committing itself to continued participation in the wider councils of the Anglican Communion” and “deepen its involvement with communion ministries and networks.”The other provinces in Category B (and a summary of their actions) are Australia (sent to dioceses for study), Canada (sent to dioceses for study, also seeking theological, ecclesiastical, legal and constitutional implications of action to adopt or not), England (majority of its dioceses voted covenant down, possible consideration of “following motions”), Korea (acknowledged sections 1-3 as “excellent and useful” with decision postponed for further consideration of Section 4), Melanesia (reports having no difficulties with first three sections, consideration deferred until 2014 General Synod), Southern Africa (adopted pending ratification at next synod meeting later this year), and Wales (requested clarification from ACC15 on covenant status and process in light of England’s position).There is one province assigned to Category C — the Episcopal Church in the Philippines. The summary document notes that the Anglican Communion Office “is seeking clarification” of a report in the “Philippine Episcopalian” newsletter that said the province’s Council of Bishops had rejected the covenant.On Oct. 31, the ACC will have “an opportunity to talk about what Anglicans are learning” by way of considering the covenant, according to the Rev. Canon Alyson Barnett-Cowan, the communion’s director of unity, faith and order.ACC15 includes ecumenical participantsSix ecumenical clerics are participating in the Anglican Consultative Council’s meeting in Auckland. They are the Rev. Robert Gribben of Australia, representing the World Methodist Council; the Rev. Dong-Sung Kim of Geneva, representing the World Council of Churches; Monsignor Mark Langham of Rome, representing the Roman Catholic Church; the Rev. Paul Patitsas of New Zealand, representing the Ecumenical Patriarchate (Orthodox); the Rt. Rev. Lok Oi Peng of Malaysia, representing the Lutheran World Federation; and the Rt. Rev. Dirk Jan Schoon of the Netherlands, representing the Old Catholic Union of the Churches of Utrecht.Resolutions committee namedEpiscopal Church ACC member Josephine Hicks is one of four people on ACC15’s resolutions committee. The other members are Philippa Amable from the Church of the Province of West Africa, John Stuart of the Scottish Episcopal Church and Garth Blake of the Anglican Church of Australia. The ACC today begin to consider resolutions from its networks, members and other communion organizations. For an example of the kinds of resolutions the ACC has passed out of previous meetings, here are the resolutions from the ACC14 meeting in 2009 in Jamaica and here are those from the 13th ACC meeting in 2005. – The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Cathedral Dean Boise, ID The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Anglican Covenant October 30, 2012 at 10:16 am Is there a link to the report on the Covenant? Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Director of Music Morristown, NJ The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York center_img Rector Smithfield, NC Youth Minister Lorton, VA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK The Rev. Ann Fontaine says: Rector Bath, NC An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Submit an Event Listing Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Anglican Communion, Submit a Press Release Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Featured Jobs & Calls Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Tampa, FL Comments (1) Rector Collierville, TN Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Shreveport, LA By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Oct 30, 2012 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Associate Rector Columbus, GA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GAlast_img read more

June 20, 2021 | |Post a Comment

first_img Rector Belleville, IL [Anglican Journal] Desmond Tutu, Archbishop Emeritus of Cape Town, captured headlines this past weekend with harsh and controversial criticism of the Alberta oil sands made while attending a May 31 to June 1 conference in Fort McMurray, Alberta.Media attention has focused most on his comment that “The fact that this filth is being created now, when the link between carbon emissions and global warming is so obvious, reflects negligence and greed.” It was part of Tutu’s keynote address at a two-day conference, organized by the Athabasca Chipewyan First Nation (ACFN) and the law firm Olthuis Kleer Townsend, titled “As Long as the Rivers Flow: Coming Back to the Treaty Relationship in our Time.”Tutu’s criticisms and call for action seemed to go further in some ways than the position discussed by Chief Allan Adam of the ACFN, who acknowledged that many people’s livelihoods depend on economic development related to the oil sands. “We don’t want to stop development. We don’t want to shut it down,” he told the crowd of about 200 people attending the conference.“We would like the government of Alberta and Canada to impose the regulations that guide industry for what we call sustainable development and responsible development to occur in this region,” Adam said. “And somewhere down the line, they’ve forgotten that, and because of that, our way of life on the lakeshores of Lake Athabasca continuing all the way down the MacKenzie is threatened because we continue to survive and live off the land.” Some of the people attending the conference spoke of fears for their health and the lives of their children and grandchildren because of pollution, particularly of the water, from the oil sands.Much of Tutu’s criticism was from a global perspective and was focused on the need to reduce carbon emissions to halt the effects of climate change. “I have witnessed the vulnerability of some of the communities most affected by climate change,” he said. “The urgency of our responsibility to take action has never been clearer. Every day, hundreds of millions of lives and livelihoods are affected by global warming…,” he said. “That is why I have been outspoken in support of citizen-led strategies that will force governments and corporations to move away from our dependence on fossil fuels and towards safer and cleaner energies that can protect people and our planet. This is why I have stood in solidarity with communities across Canada and the United States that are opposing the proposed oil sands pipelines.”The archbishop added that the countries and companies primarily responsible for emitting carbon and accelerating climate change will have to be pushed to “do the right thing. Just as Canadians reached out to help South Africans rid themselves of the scourge of apartheid, we can work together again to protect our planet from the worst of dangerous climate change,” he said.When a participant in the conference asked Tutu how to encourage leaders of fossil fuel companies to have the courage to transition to clean energy such as solar or wind, he answered that grassroots efforts from many would be required. “You are going to have to go onto the streets. You are going to have to have demonstrations—you know, the things that indicate that many are taking it seriously. Write letters to the press. Do all the things that we did against apartheid.”When a participant asked about his council for the movement to divest funds away from the fossil fuel industry, he asked her, “Do you have a helmet?…Prepare yourself for a really rough ride,” he advised, saying that such efforts would meet powerful opposition. But he added, “Just go on persuading more and more people to join you—religious communities, different denominations. Do as they did in the Free South Africa movement, because we wouldn’t have made it without your help.” Tutu was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1984 for his opposition to apartheid in South Africa.Tutu has made strong critiques of the oil sands and pipeline projects in the past. Just prior to his visit to Fort McMurray, the Anglican Church of Canada outlined its position on the issue in a statement on its website, acknowledging both the importance of the industry to many people’s livelihoods as well as concerns for the environment and indigenous rights. The General Synod of the Anglican Church of Canada issued a statement on “responsible resource extraction” with the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada at their Joint Assembly in 2013, which affirmed that “responsible and sustainable relationships to water, land, home, and each other are part of realizing our full humanity.”In his address, Tutu noted that “oil sands development not only devastates our shared climate, it is also stripping away the rights of First Nations and affected communities to protect their children, land and water from being poisoned.”Tutu reminded the audience that people on all sides of the issue are all brothers and sisters in God’s family. Recognizing our inter-connectedness, along with being magnanimous and compassionate with one another, he said, are essential ingredients in bridge-building.As the name of the conference indicated, much of the focus was on a call to governments in Canada to respect historic treaties signed with aboriginal peoples.Chief Adam pointed out a fundamental difference in the way the treaties have been understood and implemented. Treaty 8, signed on the shores of Lake Athabasca in 1899, he said, was an agreement to share the land, not surrender it, he said. When Chief Alexander Laviolette signed, he was promising to share the land “to the depth of the plough, meaning that only six inches of the land that we share with the newcomers was to grow food, to farm and to harvest. The resources were never discussed and [the land] was never surrendered to anyone,” Adam said.“This isn’t about ACFN. This is about all treaty-making people across this country,” Adam added.John Olthius of Olthuis Kleer Townsend, which was hosting the event with ACNF, said, “We are all treaty partners, and that includes corporate citizens. Now is the time. First Nations peoples have been honouring these treaties for 250 years, and in the case of Treaty 8, for over 100 years. It’s time that the rest of us honoured the treaties.” The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Director of Music Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC June 4, 2014 at 5:52 pm I hope most sincerely that the Bishop will be invited to share his message further and wider and that we who hear it are energized to become involved in whatever way we see possible….very difficult, I know, because we all drive the cars, fly the planes, and benefit from the tractors that help produce out food…..awareness precedes action, so I hope this piece goes viral Rector Albany, NY New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rick Milhon says: June 4, 2014 at 6:07 pm For many years with have mined coal and pumped oil and gas without paying the price to keep them from dirtying up our air, water and soil. We are paying the price now with increased allergies and asthma, airborne and water borne carcinogens, global warming. Despite corporation profit, we all still pay and will pay more. Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Philip Carr-Jones says: Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Submit an Event Listing Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TN August 25, 2014 at 11:55 am None of the science has been debunked. Please cite the basis for this claim Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Curate Diocese of Nebraska Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Associate Rector Columbus, GA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Press Release Servicecenter_img Rector Knoxville, TN TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Jaan Sass says: Anglican Communion Val Neeley says: Featured Events Tags Submit a Press Release Submit a Job Listing By Leigh Anne WilliamsPosted Jun 3, 2014 Rector Hopkinsville, KY Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Shreveport, LA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Martinsville, VA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Washington, DC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Smithfield, NC Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Bath, NC Comments (4) Rector Pittsburgh, PA Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Canada: Tutu slams oil sands Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Comments are closed. June 10, 2014 at 11:39 am I respect archbishop Tutu immensly but here he is on the wrong side off history. Much of the science of global warming has been debunked. Instead worrying about global warming we should be looking at ways to improve air quality in major cities, protecting the forests, parks, and natural wonders of the world. Here we can make a real difference in people’s and animals lives the other is a marketing scheme for the left and attack point for conservatives. Rector Tampa, FL Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OHlast_img read more