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December 17, 2019 | |Post a Comment

first_img“Teens don’t tweet.” Over the past few weeks, this fact has been reported time and time again by analysts, bloggers, and even mainstream media. Why the obsession with the teenage crowd on Twitter? Perhaps it’s simply because adults can’t believe that they, not teens, for once are responsible for the birth of an Internet phenomenon. But before all you adults get too comfortable with your Twitter dominance, take a look at the recent data from comScore. It appears that the youngest Twitter users – those in the 12-24 bracket – are now the fastest-growing segment of Twitter’s population. So the kids don’t tweet? Looks like they may start soon if this new data is to be believed.Kids Don’t Use TwitterAccording to a recent article in the New York Times, teens are more likely to use text messaging than Twitter for keeping up with their friends. Today’s teens feel somewhat uncomfortable with the public nature of the communication that takes place on Twitter, and, besides, they just don’t see the point in broadcasting what they’re doing to the whole world. Yet even without this age group’s participation, Twitter has seen amazing success, proving the point that a new technology does not have to be adopted by this young group of users in order to make it big. Twitter’s Youth Sees GrowthAlthough Twitter didn’t attract teens at the outset, that could still change. In fact, it looks like that change may already be underway. A newly released chart from comScore breaks down the age groups of Twitter users and plots each group’s growth over time, relative to audience. The most surprising revelation from this chart is the steep incline seen in the age group 12-24. Over the past few months, this group’s participation levels have been increasing dramatically. Facebook is Becoming Less Personal and More Pro… Related Posts The Dos and Don’ts of Brand Awareness Videos Tags:#Features#NYT#Trends#twitter#web sarah perez In reading the chart, a score of “100” means that the age group on Twitter is represented in perfect proportion to how much that age group uses the rest of the Internet as a whole. Go over 100 and that means the age group is represented more heavily on Twitter than they are represented on the rest of the web. In July, those aged 12-24 scored a “121” – a score that was only in the mid-70s a mere six months ago. Statistics Can be MisleadingBut wait – a quick glance at these statistics can be misleading. At first, it appears that the chart simply shows the increasing participation levels of teens (and young adults) on Twitter. While that may be true, it’s important to note that the actualnumber of younger users on Twitter is still much lower than those of their adult counterparts. In fact, the New York Times recently reported that only 11% of Twitter users are aged 12 to 17, according to comScore. Plus, there’s the fact that the age group 12-24 represents an odd way of breaking up the demographics. Why not 12-18 instead? The way Twitter’s user base is sliced, there’s no way to tell how many users are teens and how many are young adults in their 20s. Finally, the chart is showing audience growth compared to the rest of the Internet as a whole. That’s also an interesting way of charting the demographics of Twitter, to say the least. All that being said, the data seen here is still valuable to some extent. It’s interesting to see this market segment’s growth, even if it’s sliced and diced in this odd way. But does this mean that teens are going to start tweeting sometime soon? Let us know what you think in the comments. Guide to Performing Bulk Email Verification A Comprehensive Guide to a Content Auditlast_img read more

December 16, 2019 | |Post a Comment

first_imgPatterns did not follow assumptionsResearchers photographed 55 buildings in Manhattan, Brooklyn, and Queens over a three-month period in 2012. The properties included 18 commercial and 37 residential buildings. With more than 100 photos in hand, researchers then measured the fraction of each window covered by blinds or shades.Here are some of their findings:More than three-quarters of the buildings had more than half of their window area covered by blinds or shades.Tenants don’t seem to use blinds and shades to block strong morning and afternoon sun. That is, in the morning, slightly more window area on the western side of the buildings was covered, and in the afternoon, slightly more east-facing windows were covered — exactly the opposite of what might be expected.Patterns seemed roughly the same no matter which direction the windows faced, and there was “no appreciable difference” between commercial and residential buildings.The use of blinds and shades didn’t seem to increase at night.“This suggests glare may not be the reason blinds are widely in use,” the council says. “Perhaps it’s privacy, the inconvenience of raising them once they are lowered, or some other cause.” Environmental price tag is very highIf the only downside was the amount of money tenants waste by not taking advantage of the views they pay for, there might not be much to squawk about. It is, after all, their money.But walls of glass are extremely poor thermal insulators, leading to a variety of ill effects on society as a whole, the Urban Green Council says. Among them: higher energy costs, increased power requirements, more carbon pollution that contributes to global climate change, and more air pollution. Because windows last 50 years or more, those problems are extremely long lasting.“Tenants also experience drawbacks from large windows,” the report concludes, “including less privacy, more noise, and an increased risk of dangerous indoor temperatures during a blackout.”The Council made two suggestions. First, professional who design buildings should collaborate on ways to maintain great views while solving energy and comfort issues. Using fiberglass frames, for example, rather than more conductive aluminum would save energy. Insulating the lower two or three feet of outside walls would still provide plenty of natural light but also cut down on energy losses.Second, the council said brokers should make sure that tenants understand the “full implications” of living in a building with lots of glass. “That way,” the council says, “prospective tenants can make decisions with a clear understanding of what’s in store before they move in.” Apartment and condo dwellers in New York City pay extra for great views, with rents typically rising just as quickly as the elevator. But a study by the Urban Green Council in New York reveals that most of this high-price glass is usually covered up.Night and day, residential or commercial building, and regardless of the window’s orientation, well over half the total window area is obscured.“While the environmental downside of all-glass buildings is well documented in the green building community, we set out to answer a different question: what is the behavior of tenants in NYC who live and work in the all-glass residences and offices with those breathtaking views?” says the council’s report. “We looked at dozens of all-glass buildings and found that on average, blinds or shades covered about 59% of the window area. Tenants are moving into these rooms with a view, but more often than not, can’t see out the windows.”last_img read more

October 28, 2019 | |Post a Comment

first_imgReal Madrid coach Solari on early Bale exit: We’ll talkby Carlos Volcano10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveReal Madrid coach Santiago Solari says they’ll be speaking with Gareth Bale after he left the defeat to Real Sociedad before the final whistle.Bale, who was watching from the stands as he is currently injured, departed in the 78th minute.Solari was asked on Tuesday for his thoughts on the fact that the Welshman didn’t stay to support his teammates and revealed that the situation would be discussed internally.”These are things that are solved privately,” he told reporters. About the authorCarlos VolcanoShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

October 28, 2019 | |Post a Comment

first_imgAbout the authorFreddie TaylorShare the loveHave your say Guardiola delighted with Fernandinho as Man City cruise past Shakhtar Donestkby Freddie Taylora month agoSend to a friendShare the lovePep Guardiola has hailed Fernandinho after the Brazilian filled in at centre-half for Manchester City’s comfortable win over Shakhtar Donestk on Wednesday.John Stones’ injury in training meant Guardiola had one out-and-out centre-back to choose from in Ukraine.Playing alongside Nicolas Otamendi, 34-year-old Fernandinho was impressive in the role, helping keep a clean sheet as City romped to a 3-0 victory.Riyad Mahrez, Ilkay Gündoğan and Gabriel Jesus were the scores for Guardiola’s side.Speaking after the game, the City manager heaped praise on his make-shift defender.He said: “Fernandinho is a clever player and so intelligent, an incredible guy. He did well, it’s the first game he played.”He has a lot of experience and personality. What he says, the people follow him in the locker room.”He added: “He is a player who can play many positions and has a good personality – that’s why he is so important for us. I didn’t have doubts that he would [look so comfortable in the back four].” last_img read more

October 27, 2019 | |Post a Comment

first_imgHouston walk on scholarships awarded at team film session.YouTube/UHAthleticsWe can’t get enough of videos of college football walk-ons getting awarded scholarships. The life of a walk-on can be pretty thankless at times, especially when players have to balance schoolwork and all of the rigors of Division I athletics, without the benefit of a scholarship. A full ride can be life-changing for walk-ons and their families, and these videos always show how important those guys are to their teammates.On Wednesday, Houston head coach Tom Herman awarded two walk-ons—senior tight end Hayden Daniels and senior cornerback Tyler White—with scholarships for their final years. Herman was a bit tricky about it, opening by getting on the walk-ons who hadn’t yet had holds lifted by the university, chastising the group for a lack of “urgency,” before surprising the pair with their full rides. Daniels appeared in four games for the Cougars last year, while White played in all 13 games, registering 12 total tackles and fielding a crucial onside kick that helped spark Houston’s 35-34 comeback win over Pittsburgh in the Armed Forces Bowl.last_img read more

September 28, 2019 | |Post a Comment

INDIANAPOLIS — If there’s one thing that’s become almost painstakingly clear about the Indiana Pacers this season, it’s that they’re an acquired taste among basketball fans.Unless you’re from the state of Indiana, chances are you’re not going to find this club all that sexy. In a league flush with pace, dunks and threes, the Pacers rank near the bottom in all three. Their franchise player, high-flying All-Star Victor Oladipo, went down with a devastating, season-ending injury in January, supposedly ruining whatever chance the club had of making a deep playoff run — if it could even finish the job and reach the postseason to begin with.But focusing on what the Pacers don’t have, or won’t accomplish, might make you miss something important: Indiana possesses perhaps more grit than any NBA team.Of course there are two concerns with a statement like that. First, as numbers-heavy as we are at this site, we couldn’t quite come up with anything to measure the Pacers’ heart (although we pieced together a number of things to make a solid argument). Second, and perhaps more important for the time being: For all the heart Indiana possesses, looking at the team’s recent results might lead you to believe the struggling team is on life support.Before their home win here over the Pistons on Monday night, the Pacers had lost seven of their past eight and were coming off a dismal 4-10 record in March, by far their worst month of the campaign. They’ll head into Detroit on Wednesday in the midst of a 10-game road-losing streak — concerning for a team in danger of falling to the fifth seed and losing home-court advantage in the first round.Aside from a much tougher schedule lately (of those 10-straight road defeats, nine have come to teams that will make the playoffs),1This rationale might comfort Pacers fans. But if Indiana can’t beat playoff-caliber teams on the road anymore, that probably speaks volumes about the team’s prospects of making it out of a second-round series, if it even gets that far. Indiana has struggled to generate consistent offense in Oladipo’s absence. The team logged just 106.5 points per 100 possessions during the month of March, the league’s fourth-worst scoring attack during that span, according to NBA Advanced Stats.More and more, the Pacers’ hardscrabble offense has been putting too much pressure on the team’s third-ranked defense. Before Oladipo’s injury ended his season, Indiana was 16-12 when giving up 100 points or more. But since he left the lineup, and the team’s margin for error shrank immeasurably, the Pacers have gone just 6-17 when surrendering 100 or more.Understandably, the team was a mess immediately after Oladipo’s injury, which required him to be carried off on a stretcher before the home crowd. General manager Kevin Pritchard gave an emotional rallying cry in the locker room after the game, reminding the players that they’d gone 7-4 without Oladipo already this season (as opposed to 0-7 the season before) and were still 5 points per 100 possessions better than their opponents with him off the floor. But that didn’t stop Indiana from falling into a season-worst four-game skid. Adjustments were needed.“It’s a totally different thing to play those 11 games without him when you know in the back of your mind that you’re going to get him back healthy,” coach Nate McMillan said of Oladipo, who was also an All-NBA defender. “But after the injury, we knew he wasn’t coming back. So we had to change everything [in our offense] and hit the reset button.”That meant shifting from a relatively open system — one that often encouraged players (especially Oladipo) to take midrange shots if opponents sagged off — to one that’s more heavily synchronized. Indiana has tripled its number of ball screens for Bojan Bogdanovic,2Since February, Bogdanovic has gotten a ball screen 12.7 times per 100 possessions — up from just 4.2 per 100 possessions prior to Oladipo’s injury, according to data from Second Spectrum. giving him a downhill advantage to set up open teammates if and when defenses collapse into the paint.With more playmaking responsibilities, Bogdanovic has upped his scoring average from 16 points before the Oladipo injury to almost 22 per game since then. He and Wes Matthews, who signed with the Pacers after being bought out following the trade deadline, have replaced the vast majority of Oladipo’s shot attempts. Thaddeus Young’s play has been noteworthy, too, as he has basically doubled his assist average since Oladipo went down. All three players factored into Indiana turning things around in February, winning eight of nine — albeit against suspect competition.Effort has been one of Indiana’s defining traits, both this season and in previous years. After posting that 0-7 mark without Oladipo in 2017-18, the Pacers now stand 21-21 in games without their star this season. They’re highly physical, almost always preferring to fight through screens as opposed to switching on defense, like most teams do. They dive on the floor for extra possessions and rank near the top in recovering loose balls on D. And they’ve developed an attitude that suggests that no deficit is too big for them to overcome. In one of their best wins of the season, the Pacers rallied from 19 down last month to beat ex-Indiana star Paul George and the Thunder. It marked a league-high 19th time over the past three seasons that Indiana had come back to win a game it once trailed by 15 points or more, according to ESPN’s Stats & Information Group.But the struggles over the past month and change have illustrated that effort, which these Pacers are built on, can take you only so far — especially now that Indiana’s foes are bona fide playoff clubs again.“When you’re struggling offensively, it’s hard to grind on these guys and yell, ‘C’mon guys: Keep guarding! Get your intensity up!’ when you can just see their confidence oozing out of them and slipping away with each missed shot,” Pacers assistant coach Dan Burke told me.Put another way: At a certain point, you can only get so much defense out of a team that isn’t producing anything on offense.That isn’t to suggest there isn’t talent on the roster, because there is. It just hasn’t been reliable from top to bottom. Take the two biggest acquisitions from last summer: Tyreke Evans and Doug McDermott. Evans, who figured to be an enormous insurance policy as a ball-handler in case anything happened to Oladipo, has been the NBA’s worst finisher at the rim.3Literally the worst. Out of the 85 players who have taken at least 250 shots from the restricted area, Evans — at 45.7 percent — is the only one shooting worse than 50 percent. And while McDermott has been fine, he’s had unusually wild shooting swings, depending on whether he’s playing at home (just over 30 percent from 3-point range) or on the road (where he’s slightly better than 48 percent from 3-point range).Indiana uses cutters better than most teams. But the Pacers are often slow to identify the mismatches they have when opposing defenses counter their screen-and-roll action with a switch. In fact, no team generates less efficient offense than the Pacers (who score a minuscule 0.81 points per possession) do when getting a switch, according to data from Second Spectrum.Video Playerhttps://fivethirtyeight.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/SWITCHES.mp400:0000:0001:38Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.And as you might guess, crunch-time offense has often been a struggle for Indiana, one of a handful of teams to average less than 1 point per possession in those scenarios since Oladipo’s injury.There are obviously plenty of things the Pacers do well, and they still somehow have an outside chance of reaching the 50-win mark. Domantas Sabonis has become one of the NBA’s most efficient bench scorers. Indy shoots very well from three; they simply don’t take many (29th in attempt rate). Yet the team’s bread and butter is its defense, where players like Young and block machine Myles Turner (both of whom deserve All-Defensive Team consideration)4And in Turner’s case, Defensive Player of the Year consideration. frequently force opponents into mistakes. Indiana has occasional breakdowns, too, of course. But the fact remains that the Pacers usually keep themselves in games on that end of the floor.Whether their defense will keep them in the playoffs for long is a separate question. But even if it doesn’t, we can rest assured that the Pacers — warts and all — will leave whatever they’ve got on the court.Check out our latest NBA predictions. read more

September 28, 2019 | |Post a Comment

OSU players sing “Carmen Ohio” following a 34-17 win against Navy at M&T Bank Stadium in Baltimore on Aug. 30.Credit: Mark Batke / Photo editorThe Ohio State football team entered its season-opener against Navy on Saturday with a plethora of question marks throughout the team. The depth chart was filled with listings of one player “or” another set to start, and a redshirt-freshman quarterback was set to be under center for the first time as a Buckeye.While not every question was answered in the game, The Lantern’s sports editors picked five key takeaways from the Buckeyes’ 34-17 victory at M&T Bank Stadium in Baltimore.1. There won’t be an “or” at quarterback on OSU’s next depth chartComing into the game against Navy, there was still some speculation as to whether redshirt-sophomore quarterback Cardale Jones would replace Barrett for any amount of time against Navy.Before the game, OSU coach Urban Meyer said there was no set plan for that to happen, but left the door open for a possible Jones appearance despite the fact that Barrett was listed as the only starter under center.On Saturday, Barrett played the entire game and gave the coaches no glaring reason to pull him. The Wichita Falls, Texas, native completed 12 of 15 pass attempts — including at least one drop — and threw two touchdowns and one interception. The pick, which came in the red zone, was the only clear mistake Barrett made throughout the game.While he still wasn’t — and never will be ­— the runner that senior quarterback Braxton Miller is, Barrett still managed to lead the Buckeyes with 50 yards on the ground.He wasn’t asked to do a lot, but for all intents and purposes, Barrett passed his first test with flying colors.2. Offensive line partially sorted out, but still a red flagSpeaking of question marks on the depth chart, there might not be a position group with more unknowns than the offensive line.On the depth chart released by OSU before the Navy game, only three of the five offensive line positions had a set starter listed. Junior Taylor Decker, redshirt-sophomore Pat Elflein and redshirt-senior Darryl Baldwin were set to get the starting nod at left tackle, right guard and right tackle, respectively.All three did end up starting, although Elflein was moved over to left guard while redshirt-freshman Billy Price started at right guard. Junior Jacoby Boren started at center and played the vast majority of the game for OSU.It looks like Boren will have that spot locked down going forward, but Price and senior Joel Hale rotated during the game at the second guard position after Price struggled early. It could be argued that Hale had the better overall day, and you can look for both to continue fighting for playing time the rest of the season.Even if the line is sorted out in the coming weeks, it’ll have to improve — Meyer said he was “very disappointed” by its performance against Navy.3. Young Buckeye backs impressed in debutsReplacing a 1,000-yard rusher at running back is never easy, but a few young Buckeyes proved they can handle the football in their hands.Freshman running back Curtis Samuel showed he can handle the pressures of major college football as he recorded 45 yards on seven carries in his Buckeye debut.Redshirt-freshman H-back Jalin Marshall showed why he has been pushing sophomore H-back Dontre Wilson for touches against Navy as he showed explosiveness on a few outside runs. Ultimately though, Wilson proved he is still deserving of a starting job as he led the Buckeyes in yards per carry (7.2) against Navy as he finished with 43 yards rushing to go along with another 46 yards receiving. Sophomore running back Ezekiel Elliot did not have a big day, but he did account for OSU’s only rushing score as he amassed 44 yards on 12 carries in the Buckeye win.  4. OSU kickers will likely split dutiesFreshman kicker Sean Nuernberger accounted for all of OSU’s first half points against Navy as he converted on field goal attempts of 46 yards and 28 yards in his first college appearance. Redshirt-senior kicker Kyle Clinton however, assumed the kickoff duties for the Buckeyes but did not exactly impress, booting one kick out of bounds, resulting in a penalty. Despite that, it appears the two kickers will continue to split duties barring an injury or poor performances from one or the other. 5. ‘Silver Bullet’ secondary remains untested As expected, the Navy offense did not attempt the throw the ball much against the Buckeye defense, completing two of just four pass attempts in the 34-17 loss to OSU. Entering Saturday, the Buckeye defense will be up against a much more traditional offense as Virginia Tech comes to Columbus.The Hokie offense is led by Texas Tech transfer quarterback Michael Brewer who, in his first start for Virginia Tech, threw for 251 yards on 23 of 30 passing attempts. Needless to say, the OSU secondary that struggled mightily in 2013 will face its first real test Saturday. The Buckeye secondary, which returns only one starter from 2013 in senior cornerback Doran Grant, will play in front of its home fans for the first time in 2014 when it takes on Virginia Tech at Ohio Stadium on Saturday. Kickoff is scheduled for 8 p.m. read more

September 28, 2019 | |Post a Comment

Ohio State freshman guard Luther Muhammad (1) dribbles the ball during the first half of the game against Northwestern on Feb. 20. Ohio State won 63-49. Credit: Amal Saeed | Assistant Photo EditorTuesday will begin a closing stretch of games head coach Chris Holtmann views as one of the toughest of the season for Ohio State. The Buckeyes will face three Big Ten teams currently ranked in the Associated Press Top 25 in the final four games of the regular season: No. 22 Iowa, No. 14 Purdue and No. 19 Wisconsin. With an Ohio State team on the bubble for a spot in the NCAA Tournament, and with this stretch of games heading into the Big Ten tournament, Holtmann said his team is in a position not many teams have the opportunity to be in. “We all know what was said about this group earlier in the year, before the season got started, and we’ve got an opportunity here to see how we can finish,” Holtmann said. “We get what we earn.” Projected StartersOhio State (17-10, 7-9 Big Ten)G — C.J. Jackson — Senior, 12.5 ppg, 4.2 rpg, 3.4 apgG — Luther Muhammad — Freshman, 8.9 ppg, 3.0 rpg, 2.0 apgF — Justin Ahrens — Freshman, 2.1 ppg, 1.3 rpg, 0.2 apgF — Andre Wesson — Junior, 8.9 ppg, 4.4 rpg, 1.7 apgF — Kaleb Wesson — Sophomore, 14.4 ppg, 6.5 rpg, 1.7 apgNo. 22 Iowa (21-6, 10-6 Big Ten)G — Jordan Bohannon — Junior, 11.7 ppg, 2.2 rpg, 3.5 apgG — Joe Wieskamp — Freshman, 11.1 ppg, 4.6 rpg, 1.0 apgG — Isaiah Moss — Redshirt junior, 9.9 ppg, 2.8 rpg, 1.9 apgF — Tyler Cook — Junior, 16.0 ppg, 8.0 rpg, 2.5 apgF — Luka Garza — Sophomore, 13.3 ppg, 4.9 rpg, 0.9 apgAs the No. 6 team in the Big Ten, the Hawkeyes have won five of their past six games, taking a 76-70 overtime win against Indiana Friday. Iowa will bring the No. 1 scoring offense in the conference to Columbus Tuesday, averaging 80.4 points per game and shooting 46.6 percent from the field, which is second-best behind Michigan State. Ohio State already has an idea of what the Iowa offense looks like, having lost to the Hawkeyes 72-62 Jan. 12. Despite the Buckeyes leading 26-24 at halftime, Iowa exploded to make 15-of-27 from the field in the second half.“We thought that it was a win,” sophomore forward Kaleb Wesson said. “I feel like going into the second half, we didn’t have the same intensity and came out with the same toughness that we had the first time in the first half.” Much of the Hawkeyes’ success was due to the play of its two starting forwards: junior Tyler Cook and sophomore Luka Garza. Against Ohio State, they combined for 31 points, converting on 11-of-17 attempts from the field with 12 rebounds. Wesson said that both Iowa forwards do a good job of sealing, getting them multiple touches in the paint. Holtmann said the reason why both forwards have put up the numbers they have is because of the shooting ability of the rest of the starting lineup. The Hawkeyes are No. 3 in the Big Ten in 3-point field goal percentage. In his first year with the Buckeyes, Holtmann knew of Cook, the player who leads Iowa this season with 16 points per game. But Garza was the one who made the lasting impact. “I was so impressed with Garza last year when we played them,” Holtmann said. “And he has proven to be as good of a player as he is.” Garza made 6-of-7 shot attempts against the Buckeyes Jan. 12, leading the team with 16 points. On the outside, Holtmann said senior guard C.J. Jackson will return to the starting lineup after being sidelined with a shoulder injury Saturday against Maryland. After earning his first career start against the Terrapins Saturday, freshman forward Justin Ahrens will continue to have opportunities in an increased role, Holtmann said. He added that the starting spot is still “fluid,” though. In five games against ranked opponents this season, Ohio State is winless. Its past two losses to ranked teams have been by double digits. However, Holtmann said he senses a level of urgency heading into Tuesday’s matchup with the Hawkeyes, saying, “You’ve got to be living in a cave if you don’t have that feeling.” But the number attached to Iowa does not change the mentality of Wesson ahead of Tuesday’s game. “Every game from now [on] is the biggest game of the season,” Wesson said. “We have to go into practice and think our biggest game is Tuesday.” Ohio State will take on No. 22 Iowa at the Schottenstein Center at 7 p.m. Tuesday. read more